Posts Tagged ‘Apples’

MyPatriotSupply Survival Store Has a Passion for Self-sufficiency and Emergency Preparedness

Sunday, September 9th, 2012
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The MyPatriotSupply survival store was founded in 2008 by people with a passion for self-sufficiency and emergency preparedness. We not only understand the drive to practice emergency preparedness, we are active participants in the survivalist lifestyle. We earnestly believe that true freedom comes from attaining a certain level of self-reliance and our survival store was created with this truth in mind.

MyPatriotSupply features only the finest quality survival items, including our signature Survival Seed Vault, a wide selection of individual survival heirloom seeds, an array of home canning supplies, and the finest long term storage food currently available. MyPatriotSupply also specializes in emergency water filtration, and features the Lifestraw, the award winningpersonal water filtration straw that eliminates 99.99999% of waterborne bacteria and parasites. So no matter what your survival needs, you can trust that you will find a quality products and be treated with respect. We believe that fear mongering and price gouging are unacceptable, so we price each survival item fairly and offer free shipping on all orders over $49.

GELATIN DESSERTS

Tuesday, August 17th, 2010

GELATIN DESSERTS


Gelatin desserts are made and unmolded the same as gelatin salads, except that they are almost made with fruit and very frequently have whipped or plain cream folded into them or it is served over them. Rich cream mixtures that are thickened with just enough gelatin to permit them to be molded are known as Bavarian Cream, Charlotte Russe, etc. These desserts are particularly well adapted to summertime meals; they can be rich without being stodgy and are cool and refreshing to eat as well as to make. Attractively shaped metal, glass or pottery molds are interesting to have for making molded desserts, but with a little imagination these desserts can be molded beautiful in shallow pans, small mixing bowls, custard cups, etc. Once the gelatin has set, the molds should always be covered tightly to prevent the food from getting dry on the surface or pulling away from the sides of the mold.

APPLE DELIGHT

1 Tablespoon gelatin (1 envelope)
1/8 teaspoon salt
1 lb. tart cooking apples
¼ cup cold water
3 tablespoons lemon juice
1 cup sugar
1/3 teaspoon grated lemon rind
½ cup water

Soften gelatin in cold water. Boil sugar and the ½ cup water slowly for 3 minutes, counting time after boiling starts. Add salt and peeled, sliced apples (should be 3 cups); cover, simmer until tender. Remove from heat, stir in gelatin, then lemon juice and rind; cool. Pour into mold or bowl; chill until firm. Unmold and serve with cold Custard Sauce, or cream. 4 servings

Variation: To save sugar, substitute 1 cup sweet cider for the ½ cup water, reduce sugar to ½ cup, and omit lemon juice and rind.

STEWED APPLES

Thursday, August 12th, 2010

STEWED APPLES

Fall apples tend to keep their shape when cooked rather than mushing up like summer apples. Jonathans, Pippen, Spyrs, Baldwins and many other varieties are more adaptable to stewed apples that apple sauce. They should be cooked in a sugar syrup from the beginning to aid in keeping their shape and color.

1 cup sugar
1 cup water
1 quart peeled quartered apples (about 8 medium)
1 lemon, juice or slices as desired
Cinnamon, if desired
Cream

Combine sugar and water and heat to boiling. Add apples, cover, and cook slowly until syrup boils; continue cooking gently, pressing the apples don occasionally with a spoon until they are tender and transparent-looking. If lemon slices are used, cut very thin and add to the hot syrup along with the apples. If lemon juice is preferred, add when apples are done. Add cinnamon to give desired color and flavor. Serve in their own syrup, warm or cold, with cream is desired. 5 to 6 servinges.

SPICED APPLE SLICES

Thursday, August 12th, 2010

Jonathan Apple

The Jonathan apple is a medium-sized sweet apple, with a strong touch of acid and a tough but smooth skin. It is closely related to the Esopus Spitzenburg apple.
History

There are two alternative theories about the origin of the Jonathan apple.

The first is that it was grown by Rachel Negus Higley. Mrs. Higley gathered seeds from the local cider mill in Connecticut before the family made their journey to the wilds of Ohio in 1804 where she planted them. She continued to carefully cultivate her orchard and named the resulting variety after her husband, Jonathan Higley.

The other theory is that it originated from an Esopus Spitzenburg seedling in 1826 from the farm of Philip Rick in Woodstock, Ulster County, New York. Although it may have originally been called the “Rick” apple, it was soon
renamed by Judge Buel, President of Albany Horticultural Society, after Jonathan Hasbrouck, who discovered the apple and brought it to Buel’s attention.

SPICED APPLE SLICES

1 2/3 cups sugar
1 ½ cups vinegar
1 ½ teaspoons whole cloves
1 Stick cinnamon (3” long)
1 lb. Jonathan apples (4 medium)

Combine sugar, vinegar, cloves and cinnamon in a saucepan, boil for 3 minutes. Core and cut each apple into 4 slices and add to the syrup. Simmer for 7 or 8 minutes, or until apples are transparent, turning slices very carefully during cooking and spooning syrup over them occasionally. Remove apples to cool. Reserve syrup and use again to make more spiced apple slices. Add a little more sugar and vinegar when using syrup a second time. These are delicious served with ham or poultry. 4 servings.


By: Twitter Buttons

POACHED APPLES

Thursday, August 12th, 2010

POACHED APPLES

Combine 1 cup water, 2 cups sugar and the juice of 1 lemon (3 tablespoons) in a ten-inch aluminum skillet or a shallow saucepan and simmer fine minutes. Wash and core 2 lb. tart apples, cut in crosswise slices or rings ¾ inch thick, and drop them into the hot syrup; simmer until tender. Lift out and serve hot with bacon or sausage. The syrup may be used several times if a little more water and sugar are added each time. 5 servings.