Archive for the ‘Vegatables’ Category

Be prepared to feed your family tasty affordable meals.

Friday, October 26th, 2012
26

http://www.mypatriotsupply.com/?Click=27606 

The MyPatriotSupply survival store was founded in 2008 by people with a passion for self-sufficiency and emergency preparedness. We not only understand the drive to practice emergency preparedness, we are active participants in the survivalist lifestyle. We earnestly believe that true freedom comes from attaining a certain level of self-reliance and our survival store was created with this truth in mind.

MyPatriotSupply features only the finest quality survival items, including our signature Survival Seed Vault, a wide selection of individual survival heirloom seeds, an array of home canning supplies, and the finest long term storage food currently available. MyPatriotSupply also specializes in emergency water filtration, and features the Lifestraw, the award winningpersonal water filtration straw that eliminates 99.99999% of waterborne bacteria and parasites. So no matter what your survival needs, you can trust that you will find quality products and be treated with respect. We believe that fear mongering and price gouging are unacceptable, so we price each survival item fairly and offer free shipping on all orders over $49.

We all need to prepare for the unexpected.  Food storage, gardening etc. helps us by giving us good tasty foods that are easy to prepare and tasty for the whole family, and food for every unexpected occasion, weather it is unexpected company, drought, or many other happenings.

My Patriot Supply

Tuesday, October 2nd, 2012
26

MyPatriotSupply.com?/click=27606

Southern Utah Food Storage – Providing Long Term Food Storage to meet the needs of your Family

Southern Utah Food Storage – Providing Long Term Food Storage to meet the needs of your Family Needs

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MyFoodStorage Meals provide your family the peace of mind in any emergency situation. If you need emergency food storage  or long term food we have the package for you. MyFoodStorage products have a 25 year shelf life, best quality, best prices and are ready to eat in minutes by just adding water! Not to mention the fastest  food storage delivery around.  At MyFoodStorage, we know the value of a healthy, great-tasting food supply, and the importance of peace of mind.My Food Storage provides families and individuals with the highest quality long term food available. Our food is made with the freshest ingredients, grown on farms across the United States, rich in nutrients and robust with natural flavor. We are happy to provide you with the best freeze dried food storage quality, taste, and value in long term food, because we know the importance of putting gourmet meals on the table.

For this reason, our gourmet freeze-dried meals are meticulously crafted to meet your standards and needs. Sealed tight within our efficient Mylar pouches and then locked within durable buckets, our meals carry a 25 year shelf life, no rotation needed. We offer a wide variety of delicious meals to choose from, at a great low price of just about $1.50 per meal, not to mention the fastest food supply delivery around with shipping next day. Your safety and satisfaction are important to us, invest in food storage now, and invest in your life.

MyFoodStorage provides a wide variety of emergency food for any kind of disaster preparedness. From our best-selling ready-made meals to our gourmet freeze dried meats, fruits, and vegetables. We also provide camping meals and 72 hour kits, backup generators and emergency stoves, and survival kits with all the essential emergency supplies you need. Of course, water storage is the most vital survival product to have, which is why we sell the best solution out there: the effective and affordable water box. We make it a top priority to only offer the best without sacrificing affordability. Buy all of your disaster prep supplies with us, the dependable company you can trust.

You can order direct online, or call us at 888-407-0833.   

 Your Shipment will go out next business day.  FREE DELIVERY on order over  $50.00

You will never feel so good as the day you know you will always have enjoyable food for you family!

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MyPatriotSupply Survival Store Has a Passion for Self-sufficiency and Emergency Preparedness

Sunday, September 9th, 2012
26

The MyPatriotSupply survival store was founded in 2008 by people with a passion for self-sufficiency and emergency preparedness. We not only understand the drive to practice emergency preparedness, we are active participants in the survivalist lifestyle. We earnestly believe that true freedom comes from attaining a certain level of self-reliance and our survival store was created with this truth in mind.

MyPatriotSupply features only the finest quality survival items, including our signature Survival Seed Vault, a wide selection of individual survival heirloom seeds, an array of home canning supplies, and the finest long term storage food currently available. MyPatriotSupply also specializes in emergency water filtration, and features the Lifestraw, the award winningpersonal water filtration straw that eliminates 99.99999% of waterborne bacteria and parasites. So no matter what your survival needs, you can trust that you will find a quality products and be treated with respect. We believe that fear mongering and price gouging are unacceptable, so we price each survival item fairly and offer free shipping on all orders over $49.

TWENTY ACRES AND HEAVEN

Wednesday, August 1st, 2012
26

TWENTY ACRES AND HEAVEN

I cannot describe to you how wonderful it is to live on twenty acres in the middle of nowhere.

I did not think I would love our home the way I do.  Most of the land is unused.  That is part of the charm of living here is how vast it appears to me.  Our land goes up along the side of a mountain.  There is a valley below us and a mountain on the other side of the valley.  Small communities of approximately 4 families live on that side of the valley.  To one side of our mountain is a road that goes to a reservoir and recreation area. To the other side are farms, ranches and cattle grazing.  Before moving here I would not have believed how beautiful and peaceful this could be.

There is no way I can describe how comfortable and relaxed I feel on our property and in our home.

About ½ of the way up the property is where we placed our home and other buildings; our home, a utility room (where we monitor our off grid utilities (solar and wind power).  Our property is comprised of a garage to park two of our vehicles; storage room for animal feed, tools etc.  A small fenced yard for ducks, their pond, shelter, vegetation, etc., a chicken coop, our house and a storage room for all our seasonal possession, a small shed for the cats.  We also raise meat birds, such as chickens and turkeys.  In our future we plan pigs and goats.

We raise a large garden; which we eat fresh, can via wet pack – pressure cooked, dried, frozen etc.  We purchase a beef and have it cut and rapped to put in the freezer.  We purchase freeze dried food products, spices and other seasonings.  We raise a garden; which we freeze, bottle and/or dehydrate.  Our water comes from our own well.

We have been outside and water garden and feed the animals.  My husband is listening to the radio as I type this article.  Before we moved here; we had contemplating raising our own livestock; however, as it turns out, it was less expensive to purchase the beef after some else raised it and had it cut and wrapped for the freezer.

We also purchase fruits and vegetables grown in other regions and/or not available in our area due to climate, such as pineapple.

I currently purchase a case of pineapple, which I froze for later use in baking.  (My husband’s favorite desert is pineapple pie.)

Currently we have an abundance of zucchini.  But, then who doesn’t (If they garden – If you don’t garden – purchased them at the grocery store.) I have been grating my zucchini and freeze in the quantity required for my favorite recipe for zucchini bread and cake recipes; for later use.

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Color printing, we have it at a discount price. http://www.viralprintmembers.com/Larsen123/

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ZUCCHINI CAKE

2 cups sugar

1 tablespoon cinnamon

1 cup oil

2 cups shredded, unpeeled zucchini, packed

3 eggs

1 cup finely chopped nuts (if desired)

1 teaspoon soda

1 teaspoon salt

1 tablespoon vanilla

Cream Cheese Frosting (Recipe to follow)

Beat sugar, oil, and eggs at medium speed in electric mixer bowl (or bread machine) for 4 minutes.  Sift together flour, soda, salt, and cinnamon.  Fold zucchini and nuts into sugar mixture.  Fold in flour mixture and vanilla, blending thoroughly.  Turn batter into a well-greased 10-inch tube pan.  Bake in preheated oven at 350 degrees about 60 to 65 minutes.  Cool in pan or rack 15 minutes or longer.  Remove pan and cool cake thoroughly on rack before frosting with Cream Cheese Frosting.

 

Cream Cheese Frosting

3 cups powdered sugar, sifted

2 (3-ounce) Packages cream cheese, softened

5 tablespoons butter or margarine

1 teaspoon lemon extract

Beat powdered sugar, cream cheese, margarine, and lemon extract until thoroughly blended.

 

Zucchini Bread

½ cup oil

1 cup sugar

2 eggs

1 cup grated unpeeled zucchini

1 ½ cups flour

1 ½ teaspoons cinnamon

¾ teaspoon soda

¼ teaspoon baking powder

 

Blend oil and sugar together.  Beat eggs into mixture one at a time.  Place grated zucchini in separate bowl.  Fold egg mixture into zucchini.  Sift together flour, cinnamon, soda, and baking powder.  Gradually add flour mixture to zucchini mixture.  Mix well.  Pour butter into 2 greased 8 x 4-inch loaf pans.  Bake at 325 degrees 1 hour.

Makes 2 loaves

My husband does the gardening and I do the baking.  We make a good te https://www.amazon.com/gp/css/homepage.html?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&linkCode=ur2&tag=southernutahf-20am.

 

 

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Save up to 25% on Back-to-School Essentials

 

Healthy – Verses – Harmful Diets

Thursday, April 5th, 2012

Ongoing research indicates that certain foods contain special nutrients, chemical compounds, and even bacteria that can help to prevent certain diseases, relieve health complaints, and boost energy.

Evidence from more than 300 studies has revealed that fruits and vegetables offer powerful protection against disease.  It appears that the vegetables with the most effective weapon against cancer and other diseases are the crucifers, or cabbage family, which includes broccoli and spinach.  These vegetables contain anticancer substances known as antioxidants, which attack molecules called free radicals.

Free radicals are released in all cells as part of the body’s normal biochemistry and defense mechanism against disease.  Free radicals occur as a response to everyday living—exposure to ultraviolet light waves and environmental pollutants such as motor vehicle emissions.  If free radicals become too numerous, however, they attack the body itself.  It is believed that unchecked free radical action can lead to premature aging and through damage to DNA (genetic material), some forms of cancer.

THE BENEFITS OF ANTIOXIDANTS

Stable molecules in the body have pars of electrons, but free radicals have at least one that is unpaired; this makes them unstable.  To achieve stability, free radicals steal electrons from other molecules, thereby making them unstable.  The remaining molecule, which is now a free radical, sets off to take another electron from a complete molecule.  A destructive chain reaction is thus set in motions.  Antioxidants are substances that negate the harmful effects of free radicals by providing them with an electron, but do not become unstable.  The antioxidants can then be safely broken down and absorbed by the body.

The main antioxidants are the carotenes, especially beta carotene (the plant source of vitamin A found in carrots and oranges); vitamins C and E; the minerals selenium, zinc, and magnesium; and protein, in particular glutathione, which is a combination of three amino acids—glutamate, glycine, and crysteine.  These are found in the cruciferous family, and many other fruits and vegetables, such as bananas and peas.

The antioxidants that have been subject to the most study are beta carotene, vitamin C and vitamin E.  In American trials, a high dietary intake of beta carotene has been associated with a reduced risk of both heart disease and cancer of the mouth, throat, esophagus, larynx, lungs, stomach, cervix, and bladder.  Other studies have discovered a relationship between a high dietary intake of vitamin C, found in oranges and many other fruit and vegetables, and a reduced risk of cataracts, heart and brain disease, and non-hormonal cancers such as those of the stomach, lung, and throat.  High consumption of vitamin E, found in vegetable oil and sunflower seed, has been linked to a reduced risk of gastrointestinal cancer, lung cancer, and thrombosis (blood clots).

 

No match for nicotine

Antioxidants may help to protect the body against, many illnesses, but they are no match for the effects of tobacco.  A study of 29,000 long-term Finnish smokers, all over the age of 50, by The National Cancer Institute in the United States and Finland’s National Public Health Institute found that regular doses of vitamin E and beta carotene did not lessen smokers’ chances of suffering lung cancer or stroke.  In fact, those who took the antioxidants had a higher incidence of these illnesses than a similar group of men who took nothing.  The researchers were puzzled by these unexpected results and are still analyze them.  It is possible that cancer was already in progress and that antioxidants are preventative rather than therapeutic agents.

 

PHYTOCHEMICALS

Phytochemicals were discovered in 1978 and, are hailed as the new hope in the ongoing fight against cancer Phytochemicals—and there are literally thousands of them present in vegetables and fruits—are neither vitamins nor minerals; but, rather chemical compounds that evolved to protect plants from injury and disease.  In humans, phytochemicals seem to act as potent cancer inhibitors or as agents that can help to stimulate the body’s natural mechanisms to inactivate noxious compounds.  One group of vegetables, known as the cruciferous family, is particularly rich in these chemicals, but other vegetables and fruits, such as corn and citrus fruits, also contain many important phytochemical.

 

How do phytochemicals work?

Researchers in the United States found that if the photochemical sulforaphane is added to humans cells growing in a laboratory dish, it boosts the synthesis of cancer-fighting enzymes (protein substances that act as catalysts in the body, breaking down food and aiding metabolism).  Like a policeman who removes a troublemaker from a peaceful gathering, these enzymes remove protein or actual mutagens and carcinogens from human cells by handcuffing them to molecules and whisking them away before they can cause any lasting damage.

Phytochemicals use an impressive array of cancer-blocking tactics.  Scientists of Cornell University in New York have reported that p-courmac and chlorogenic acid, two phytochemicals that are found in tomatoes as well as other fruits and vegetables, can prevent carcinogens from forming in the first place.  Another anticancer tactic of phytochemicals is to close off the capillaries, hair-thin blood vessels, which deliver nutrients to developing tumors.  But preventing existing cancers from spreading through the body is beyond the capability of these phytochemical compounds.

 

CANCER-PREVENTING VEGETABLES

The cabbages and other cruciferous vegetables are a valuable accompaniment to a meal.  Use them raw in salads, cooked on their own and sprinkled with sesame seeds, or cooked with other foods.  Eat at least one of three vegetables each day as part of the five-servings-a-day program of fruits and vegetables.  But do not restrict your intake to just one member of the cruciferous family, as they all contain important nutrients.

 

Fighting Breast Cancer

An overabundance of the hormone estrogen may stimulate the growth of breast cancer.  But recent American research has shown the phytochemicals in food may help to beat this cancer by obstructing the body’s absorption of estrogen.  Widely prevalent in the United States, breast cancer may also be related to high intakes of fats that have combined with oxygen.

A study by New York’s Strang-Cornell Cancer Research Laboratory revealed that estrogen levels fell dramatically in women who consumed a diet high in cruciferous vegetables, such as red and white cabbage and spinach.  It is thought that one of the phytochemicals found in cruciferous vegetables—indole-3-carbinol—deactivates potent estrogens, thus preventing estrogen-sensitive cells, particularly those in the breast, from developing tumors.

Another potent phytochemical that has been linked to the prevention of breast cancer is sulforaphane.  Found in cruciferous vegetables as well as carrots, turnips, and green onions, it, too, speeds up the removal of estrogen from the body.

I myself am a survivor of this very cancer.  One of the treatments that I take years later is an estrogen blocker.   I also eat lots of the cancer-preventing vegetables.

 

Cancer-Preventing Vegetables

The cabbages and other cruciferous vegetables are a valuable accompaniment to a meal.  Use them raw in salads, cooked on their own and sprinkled with sesame seeds, cooked on their own and sprinkled with sesame seeds, or cooked with other foods, eat at least one of these vegetables each day as part of the five-servings-a-day program of fruits and vegetables.  But do not restrict you intake to just one member of the cruciferous family, as they all contain important nutrients.

 

Vegetables

          Broccoli – The star of the crucifer family, broccoli is rich in beta carotene, vitamin C, potassium, calcium, folic acid and several phytochemical.

          Brussels Sprouts – Brussels sprouts are rich sources of sulforaphane and other phytochemicals and antioxidants.  They are one of the best vegetable sources of dietary fiber.

Cabbage – The many varieties of cabbage contain numerous antioxidants compounds.  Chinese cabbage (bok-choy) is a particularly rich source of beta carotene, vitamin C, potassium, and calcium.

Cauliflower – Cauliflower is rich in vitamin C, potassium, fiber, and several phytochemicals.

Spinach – Spinach contains four times more beta carotene than broccoli and is a source of vitamins C and E.  it is rich in fiber.  But it contains oxalic acid, a chemical that limits the absorption of iron and calcium.

 

Hope for the future?

          Research into phytochemicals is still in its infancy, and there has not yet been time for long-term studies on humans to see whether an existing cancer can be retarded or eradicated by these compounds.  According to scientists, phytochemical theory dovetails with the results of numerous studies that have linked diets rich in fruit and vegetables with a lower incidence of cancer.

Healthy – Verses – Harmful Diets

Ongoing research indicates that certain foods contain special nutrients, chemical compounds, and even bacteria that can help to prevent certain diseases, relieve health complaints, and boost energy.

Evidence from more than 300 studies has revealed that fruits and vegetables offer powerful protection against disease.  It appears that the vegetables with the most effective weapon against cancer and other diseases are the crucifers, or cabbage family, which includes broccoli and spinach.  These vegetables contain anticancer substances known as antioxidants, which attack molecules called free radicals.

Free radicals are released in all cells as part of the body’s normal biochemistry and defense mechanism against disease.  Free radicals occur as a response to everyday living—exposure to ultraviolet light waves and environmental pollutants such as motor vehicle emissions.  If free radicals become too numerous, however, they attack the body itself.  It is believed that unchecked free radical action can lead to premature aging and through damage to DNA (genetic material), some forms of cancer.

THE BENEFITS OF ANTIOXIDANTS

Stable molecules in the body have pars of electrons, but free radicals have at least one that is unpaired; this makes them unstable.  To achieve stability, free radicals steal electrons from other molecules, thereby making them unstable.  The remaining molecule, which is now a free radical, sets off to take another electron from a complete molecule.  A destructive chain reaction is thus set in motions.  Antioxidants are substances that negate the harmful effects of free radicals by providing them with an electron, but do not become unstable.  The antioxidants can then be safely broken down and absorbed by the body.

The main antioxidants are the carotenes, especially beta carotene (the plant source of vitamin A found in carrots and oranges); vitamins C and E; the minerals selenium, zinc, and magnesium; and protein, in particular glutathione, which is a combination of three amino acids—glutamate, glycine, and crysteine.  These are found in the cruciferous family, and many other fruits and vegetables, such as bananas and peas.

The antioxidants that have been subject to the most study are beta carotene, vitamin C and vitamin E.  In American trials, a high dietary intake of beta carotene has been associated with a reduced risk of both heart disease and cancer of the mouth, throat, esophagus, larynx, lungs, stomach, cervix, and bladder.  Other studies have discovered a relationship between a high dietary intake of vitamin C, found in oranges and many other fruit and vegetables, and a reduced risk of cataracts, heart and brain disease, and non-hormonal cancers such as those of the stomach, lung, and throat.  High consumption of vitamin E, found in vegetable oil and sunflower seed, has been linked to a reduced risk of gastrointestinal cancer, lung cancer, and thrombosis (blood clots).

 

No match for nicotine

Antioxidants may help to protect the body against, many illnesses, but they are no match for the effects of tobacco.  A study of 29,000 long-term Finnish smokers, all over the age of 50, by The National Cancer Institute in the United States and Finland’s National Public Health Institute found that regular doses of vitamin E and beta carotene did not lessen smokers’ chances of suffering lung cancer or stroke.  In fact, those who took the antioxidants had a higher incidence of these illnesses than a similar group of men who took nothing.  The researchers were puzzled by these unexpected results and are still analyze them.  It is possible that cancer was already in progress and that antioxidants are preventative rather than therapeutic agents.

 

PHYTOCHEMICALS

Phytochemicals were discovered in 1978 and, are hailed as the new hope in the ongoing fight against cancer Phytochemicals—and there are literally thousands of them present in vegetables and fruits—are neither vitamins nor minerals; but, rather chemical compounds that evolved to protect plants from injury and disease.  In humans, phytochemicals seem to act as potent cancer inhibitors or as agents that can help to stimulate the body’s natural mechanisms to inactivate noxious compounds.  One group of vegetables, known as the cruciferous family, is particularly rich in these chemicals, but other vegetables and fruits, such as corn and citrus fruits, also contain many important phytochemical.

 

How do phytochemicals work?

Researchers in the United States found that if the photochemical sulforaphane is added to humans cells growing in a laboratory dish, it boosts the synthesis of cancer-fighting enzymes (protein substances that act as catalysts in the body, breaking down food and aiding metabolism).  Like a policeman who removes a troublemaker from a peaceful gathering, these enzymes remove protein or actual mutagens and carcinogens from human cells by handcuffing them to molecules and whisking them away before they can cause any lasting damage.

Phytochemicals use an impressive array of cancer-blocking tactics.  Scientists of Cornell University in New York have reported that p-courmac and chlorogenic acid, two phytochemicals that are found in tomatoes as well as other fruits and vegetables, can prevent carcinogens from forming in the first place.  Another anticancer tactic of phytochemicals is to close off the capillaries, hair-thin blood vessels, which deliver nutrients to developing tumors.  But preventing existing cancers from spreading through the body is beyond the capability of these phytochemical compounds.

 

CANCER-PREVENTING VEGETABLES

The cabbages and other cruciferous vegetables are a valuable accompaniment to a meal.  Use them raw in salads, cooked on their own and sprinkled with sesame seeds, or cooked with other foods.  Eat at least one of three vegetables each day as part of the five-servings-a-day program of fruits and vegetables.  But do not restrict your intake to just one member of the cruciferous family, as they all contain important nutrients.

 

Fighting Breast Cancer

An overabundance of the hormone estrogen may stimulate the growth of breast cancer.  But recent American research has shown the phytochemicals in food may help to beat this cancer by obstructing the body’s absorption of estrogen.  Widely prevalent in the United States, breast cancer may also be related to high intakes of fats that have combined with oxygen.

A study by New York’s Strang-Cornell Cancer Research Laboratory revealed that estrogen levels fell dramatically in women who consumed a diet high in cruciferous vegetables, such as red and white cabbage and spinach.  It is thought that one of the phytochemicals found in cruciferous vegetables—indole-3-carbinol—deactivates potent estrogens, thus preventing estrogen-sensitive cells, particularly those in the breast, from developing tumors.

Another potent phytochemical that has been linked to the prevention of breast cancer is sulforaphane.  Found in cruciferous vegetables as well as carrots, turnips, and green onions, it, too, speeds up the removal of estrogen from the body.

I myself am a survivor of this very cancer.  One of the treatments that I take years later is an estrogen blocker.   I also eat lots of the cancer-preventing vegetables.

 

Cancer-Preventing Vegetables

The cabbages and other cruciferous vegetables are a valuable accompaniment to a meal.  Use them raw in salads, cooked on their own and sprinkled with sesame seeds, cooked on their own and sprinkled with sesame seeds, or cooked with other foods, eat at least one of these vegetables each day as part of the five-servings-a-day program of fruits and vegetables.  But do not restrict you intake to just one member of the cruciferous family, as they all contain important nutrients.

 

Vegetables

          Broccoli – The star of the crucifer family, broccoli is rich in beta carotene, vitamin C, potassium, calcium, folic acid and several phytochemical.

          Brussels Sprouts – Brussels sprouts are rich sources of sulforaphane and other phytochemicals and antioxidants.  They are one of the best vegetable sources of dietary fiber.

Cabbage – The many varieties of cabbage contain numerous antioxidants compounds.  Chinese cabbage (bok-choy) is a particularly rich source of beta carotene, vitamin C, potassium, and calcium.

Cauliflower – Cauliflower is rich in vitamin C, potassium, fiber, and several phytochemicals.

Spinach – Spinach contains four times more beta carotene than broccoli and is a source of vitamins C and E.  it is rich in fiber.  But it contains oxalic acid, a chemical that limits the absorption of iron and calcium.

 

Hope for the future?

          Research into phytochemicals is still in its infancy, and there has not yet been time for long-term studies on humans to see whether an existing cancer can be retarded or eradicated by these compounds.  According to scientists, phytochemical theory dovetails with the results of numerous studies that have linked diets rich in fruit and vegetables with a lower incidence of cancer.

FOUR SURVIVAL FOODS WHEAT, POWDERED MILK, HONEY, AND SALT

Saturday, March 3rd, 2012

The basic idea of this article is that for everyone, even those of us who live in bounteous America, the time may come when food and other necessities are not abtainable.  This situation could be brought about by any one of a number of causes.  Personal injury or illnes, unemployment, war, riots, transportaion strikes and so forth.  Our urban society is particularly vulnerable.

With less than five percent of the population, producing food through agriculture.   This small group very dependant on a continuing supply of fuel, machinery and a smoothly functioning transportation network, famine could and would depleat the supplies within within a few weeks.  If violance interupted this interdependent system of food production and distribution, food markets would empty within hours.  People would be left to their own devices to produce and provide themselves with sustanance.  The magnatude of such a tragedy; which, could result is to horrendes to contemplate.

This is not a new idea.  My mother raised us on a farm in Idaho.  She raised a garden every year.  Each fall we canned enough of the produce to make it through the winter and spring.  There was always extra.  We always had enough to last until the next harvest came and to give to those in need.  For years I have been reading and hearing counsel that families should prepare for such an eventuality by storing enough food and other necessities to last, in case of an emergency condition.  During those years national and international conditions have worsened, making the threat more menacing.

But what foods should you store for your families needs?  How can you, on the most economical basis, store foods; which, not only help to ensure our healthy survival in times of famine or other emergency; but, can be rotated to provide good meals in normal times and thus avoid spoilage?

I was steered towards the answer by early training and environment in the shape of a wise mother.  My mother not only stored the flour basics wheat, honey, powdered milk, wheat, and honey; but, she also stored produce from her garden and fruit from her trees.  I have not attempted to deal with perparation for an enemy attack, since many publication on shelter, protection against radioactive fallout, etc., are available free from various department of the government on the internet. 

Many companies procure and sell freeze dried and dehydrated food.  The freeze dried retains flavor as well and vital nutriats well.

LIVING OFF THE LAND

Tuesday, February 21st, 2012

If you have a piece of land to plant a garden you should do it. Perhaps, you live in a city with flower gardens around your house. If so consider using some of that land for a few vegetables and/or herbs. The less time from the soil to the table the better the flavor. Even if you can, freeze or dehydrate these foods they will taste better and healthier then products that are shipped in to your supper market.

Use the winter months to plan your garden. Plant what your family will eat and eat what you plant. Additionally, plant those things you have the ability to store in your home, by way of refrigeration, freezing, dehydration, and/or home canning. Be certain to use safe methods of storage and use in a safe manner. Use those foods your family prefers to eat raw as soon after harvesting from your garden as possible. Foods that are to be preserved for storage should be dated so that you use them while they are not only safe from bacteria and loose of nutrition. You can purchase books telling you specifically how to can, freeze and/or dehydrate. Purchase these book instructions and follow them carefully. Can, freeze and dehydrate only those foods that your family enjoys. There is no reason to store foods that little Johnny refuses to eat. There is no reason to believe that, because; you went to all the hard work needed to grow, prepare and serve on your table that little Johnny will eat them. Those things your family likes to eat fresh, only; should be planted in smaller quantities.

Having been raised on a farm; where we lived in a home that was planned for food storage through our the winter; I have planned my current home around food storage. We eat lots of fresh fruits and vegetables through out the summer. Lettuce and many other vegetables that are eaten in salads, etc. just do not store well on a long range basis. When I was a child living at home; I was sent to the basement with mothers shopping list so to speak. Carrots were stored in little moist sand. Onions were stored in sacks that could breath, in a cool place. Fruits and vegetables were bottled and processes for long term storage. You can obtain literature from your local extension agent. If you purchase a pressure canner it should have instructions for pressure and length of time. Be careful to follow these instructions to the letter. Not following these instructions could be hazardous to your families health.

Today we have many ways to store our food supplies through out the year. Consider those fruits and vegetables that your family enjoys. You may want to grow them in your yard, purchase them from your local supper market, or a fruit stand in a local agricultural area.

Consider growing those items that generally recognized as being best for freezing; canning; drying; pickling; juicing; making sauce; making jam, jelly and preserves; and store in some type of cold storage, (Be it a root cellar, basement, or outdoor storage area (where the temperature is moderate.) These food items should be stored at a low temperature; protected from freezing and excessive heat. The choice of where to store and in what quantities depend on what your family will eat and in what quantities and your climate.

New varieties and/or hybrids are being developed all the time, so keep a lookout for new and improved varieties.

Harvesting Vegetables and Fruits

Friday, October 28th, 2011


There is nothing like growing your own food, you’ve got it made over those who must rely on the grocery store or the supermarket for their daily sustenance, because you can pick and process the food that grows from your soil. If you grow your own food, you grown your own food, you’ve got it made over those who do have to depend on the the local grocery store. This means that you can harvest fruits and vegetables when they have reached just the right stage of maturity for eating, canning, freezing, drying, or underground storage, and you don’t have to lose any time in getting the food from the ground into safekeeping.

Whether you want your vegetables or fruits very ripe or just barely so at the time you harvest them depends upon the specific food and what you intend to do with it. In most cases, vegetables have their finest flavor when they are still young and tender: peas and corn while they taste sweet and not starchy; snap beans while the pods are tender and fleshy, before the beans inside the pods get plump; summer squash while their skins are still soft. Carrots and beets have a sweeter flavor, and leafy vegetables are crisp but not tough and fibrous, when they are young. This is the stage at which you’ll want to preserve their goodness.

Fruits, on the other hand, are usually at their best when ripe, for this is when their sugar and vitamin contents are at their peak. If you’re going to can, freeze, dry, or store them, you’ll want them fully mature. But if you plan to use your fruits for jellies and preserves, you will not want them all at their ripest because their pectin content—which helps them to gel—decreases as the fruit reaches maturity. In order to make better jellies, some of the guava, apples, plums, or currants you are using should be less than fully ripe.

With the exception of perhaps a few gardening wizards, it is impossible to control just when your peaches, pears, apples, and berries will be mature. Once planted, fruit trees and berry plants will bear their fruit year after year when the time is right. You’re at their mercy and must be prepared to harvest just when the pickings are ready if you want to get the fruit at its best.

Vegetables are a different story. Because most are annuals and bear several weeks after they are planted, you can plan your garden to allow for succession plantings that extend the harvesting season for you and furnish you with a continuous supply of fresh food. This means that you can eat fresh vegetables over several smaller harvest if you with (and your weather cooperates) and be able to preserve small batches at a time as vegetables ripen.

By planting three smaller crops of tomatoes instead of one large crop, you won’t be deluged with more tomatoes than you can possibly eat and process at one time. Space your three pea plants ten days apart in early spring and you’ll have three harvests of peas and still plenty of time to plant a later crop of something else in the same plots after all peas are picked. Vegetables like salad greens that do not keep well should be planted twice. Plant early lettuce about a month before the last frost and follow it with cauliflower. After the onions are out of the ground, put some fall lettuce in their place for September salads. If corn is one of your favorites and you’ve been waiting out the long winter for the first ears to come in, by all means, eat all the early-maturing corn you want, but make sure that enough late corn has been planted for freezing later on.

Vegetables that keep well in underground storage, like cabbage squash, and the root crops, should be harvested as late in the season as possible so you won’t have to worry about keeping vegetables cool during a warm September or early October. Some vegetables, like carrots, parsnips, and Jerusalem artichokes, can be left right in the ground over the winter, so it is wise to plant some late crops of these vegetables just for this purpose. Green and yellow beans, planted in early May, can be followed by cabbage in mid-July for a fall harvest. Beets planted in the beginning of April may be followed by carrots in July that can be stored right in the ground over the winter and into the early spring.

Choosing Vegetable and Fruit Varieties for your own Garden

Tuesday, April 12th, 2011

I am one of the lucky people who grew up in the country. My widowed mother stayed on the farm after my father died in a farming accident. She was of the opinion that her family was safer on the farm. I have sometime questioned that. As I get older I know that we did all grow up. What I did not realize is that by growing up on a farm a learned many skills that have come in very handy over the years.

Living in the rural area on a twenty plus acre parcel of land; I am able to use many of those skills. These skills include gardening, canning fruits and vegetables, freezing, and dehydrating.

I encourage everyone to have a little space that they can use for producing your own food. You may have plenty of land and are able to have animals and fruits and vegetables are just a few edible plants in your window seal.

Don’t overdo it the first time you attempt your gardening. Pick a few vegetables and fruits that you will enjoy eating.

As you page through any seed catalog, you will discover that each vegetable and fruit is usually available in a number of varieties. Some may be particularly good for freezing; others maintain their quality best when canned. Certain varieties dry better than others, and some hold their flavor and texture well in underground storage. If you’re planning to preserve a good part of your harvest, you’d do well to decide how you will be storing your garden surplus before you order your seeds and then choose those fruits and vegetables accordingly. If your family does not like a particular vegetable or fruit; don’t buy the seeds or starts. They still will not enjoy eating it just because you went to all the hard work of growing and storing this food.

If you are growing your own food, you’ve got it made over those who must rely on the grocery store or the supermarket for their daily sustenance, because you can pick and process the food that grows from your soil when its quality is at its very best. This means that you harvest fruits and vegetables when they have reached just the right stage of maturity for eating, canning, freezing, drying, or underground storage, and you don’t have to lose any time in getting the food from the ground into safekeeping, either.

Whether you want your vegetables or fruits very ripe or just barely so at the time you harvest them depends upon the specific food and what you intend to do with it. In most cases, vegetables have their finest flavor when they are still young and tender: Pease and corn while they taste sweet and not starchy; snap beans while the pods are tender and fleshy, before the beans inside the pods get plump; summer squash while their skins are still soft. Carrots and beets have a sweet flavor, and leafy vegetables are crisp but not tough and fibrous, when they are young. This is the stage at which you’ll want to preserve their goodness.

Fruits, on the other hand, are usually at their best when ripe for this is when their sugar and vitamin contents are at their peak. If you’re going to can, freeze, dry or store them, you’ll want them fully mature. But if you plan to use your fruits for jellies and preserves, you will not want them all at their ripest because their pectin content—which helps them to gel-decreases as the fruit reaches maturity. In order to make better jellies, some of the guavas, apples, plums or currants you are using should be less than fully ripe.

With the exception of perhaps a few gardening wizards, it is impossible to control just when your peaches, pears, apples and berries will be mature. Once planted, fruit trees and berry plants will bear their fruit year after year when the time is right. You’re at their mercy and must be prepared to harvest just when the pickings are ready if you want to get the fruit at its best.

Vegetables are a different story. Because most are annuals and bear several weeks after they are planted, you can plan your garden to allow for succession planting that extend the harvesting season for you and furnish you with a continuous supply of fresh food. This means that you can eat fresh vegetables over several smaller harvests if you wish (and your weather cooperates) and be able to preserve small batches at a time as vegetables ripen.

By planting three smaller crops of tomatoes instead of one large crop, you won’t be deluged with more tomatoes than you can possibly eat and process at one time. Space your three pea plants ten days apart in early spring and you’ll have three harvests of peas and still plenty of time to plant a later crop of something else in the same plots after all the peas are picked. Vegetables lake salad greens that do not keep well should be planted twice. Plant early lettuce about a month before the last frost and follow it with cauliflower. After the onions are out of the ground, put some fall lettuce in their place for September salads. If corn is one of your favorites and you’ve been waiting out the long winter for the first ears to come in, by all means, eat all the early-maturing corn you want, but make sure that enough late corn has been planted for freezing later on.

Vegetables that keep well in underground storage like cabbage, squash, and the root crops, should be harvested as late in the season as possible so you won’t have to worry about keeping vegetables cool during a warm September or early October. Some vegetable, like carrots, parsnips, and Jerusalem artichokes, can be left right in the ground over the winter, so it is wise to plant some late crops of these vegetables just for this purpose. Green and yellow beans, planted in early May, can be followed by cabbage in mid-July that can be stored right in the ground over the winter and into the early spring.