Zucchini It’s the Season

August 22nd, 2012
26

 

 

 

Zucchini

It’s the Season

Fall is coming on, summer is leaving us.  That means we are harvesting an abundance of fruits and vegetables.  What do we do with them all?   Collect all your favorite recipes from all your friends and add them to your collections.

I do not can my squash produce.  Canning or bottling tends to add to much liquid to the produce and it is harder to cook with it.

If you have more zucchini than time, bake what you can and freeze the remaining in packages containing the proper amount for your recipes.  Place a label of the freezer package with the recipe of your choice and the quantity of the zucchini in the package, as well as the quantity in each package.  Throughout the fall, winter and spring you can use up your packaged zucchini making great dessert and vegetables dishes that your family will enjoy throughout the year.

Here are a few of my favorites.

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ZUCCHINI BREAD

1 Cup granulated sugar

2 cups brown sugar

3 eggs (beaten)

1 cup canola oil

2 cups zucchini (pealed and shredded [I do not peel my zucchini; rather I just shred, measure and package for freezing or bake. My family enjoys my bread cookies etc., that I make from this product without pealing and it is less work.)

3 teaspoons vanilla

3 cups flour

1 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon baking soda

¼ teaspoon baking powder

3 teaspoons cinnamon

1 cup nuts

Combine sugars, oil and eggs; beat until well blended.  Add zucchini and vanilla.  Add flour, salt, baking soda, baking powder and

Cinnamon; Blend well; add nuts. Pour into 2 loaf pans (greased and lightly floured.  Bake 1 hour at 325 degrees.

Bunny Paxton

Enterprise Senior Citizen Cookbook 2003

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ZUCCHINI BREAD

The Broadway department store’s zucchini bread was lovely as a gift or to serve at teas.

½         cup oil

1          cup sugar

2          eggs

1          cup grated unpeeled zucchini

1 ½      cups flour

1 ½      teaspoons cinnamon

¾         cup soda

¼         teaspoon powder

Blend oil and sugar together.  Beat eggs into mixture one at a time.  Place grated zucchini in separate bowl.  Fold egg mixture into zucchini.  Sift together flour, cinnamon, soda, and baking powder.  Gradually add flour mixture to zucchini mixture.  Mix well.  Pour batter into 2 greased 8 X 4-inch loaf pans.  Bake at 325 degrees 1 hour

Makes 2 loaves.

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ZUCCHINI CAKE

Clifton’s cafeterias served a delicious zucchini cake that has quite a following among their customers.

2          cups sugar

1          cup oil

3          eggs

2          cups flour

1          teaspoon soda

1          teaspoon salt

1          tablespoon cinnamon

2          cups shredded, unpeeled zucchini, packed

1          cup finely chopped nuts

1          tablespoon vanilla

            Cream cheese frosting to follow:

Blend oil and sugar together.  Beat eggs into mixture one at a time.  Place grated zucchini in separate bowl.  Fold egg mixture into zucchini.  Sift together flour, cinnamon, soda, and baking powder.  Gradually add flour mixture to zucchini mixture.  Mix well.  Pour batter into 2 greased 8 X 4-inch loaf pans.  Bake at 325 degrees 1 hour

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Cream Cheese Frosting

Clifton’s cafeterias served a delicious zucchini cake that has quite a following among their customers.

3          cups powdered sugar, sifted

2          (3-ounce) packages cream cheese, softened

5          tablespoons butter or margarine

1          teaspoon lemon extract until thoroughly blended.

Beat powdered sugar, cream cheese, margarine, and lemon extract until thoroughly blended.

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ZUCCHINI OATMEAL COOKIES

A USC Medical Center dietetic department trainee, Leigh Hinkleman, won first froze for these spicy morsels during a nutrition-wee event.

½         cup margarine

¾         cup honey

1          egg

2          cup whole wheat flour

1          teaspoon soda

1          teaspoon cinnamon

¼         teaspoon ground cloves

¼         salt

1          cup grated zucchini

1          cup rolled oats

1          cup chopped dates or raisins          

 

            Cream cheese frosting to follow:

Blend oil and sugar together.  Beat eggs into mixture one at a time.  Place grated zucchini in separate bowl.  Fold egg mixture into zucchini.  Sift together flour, cinnamon, soda, and baking powder.  Gradually add flour mixture to zucchini mixture.  Mix well.  Pour batter into 2 greased 8 X 4-inch loaf pans.  Bake at 325 degrees 1 hour

 

 

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Freezing

ZUCCHINI AND SUMMER SQUASH

 

Most everyone is tempted to freeze zucchini, not because it’s a good freezer food, but because there’s always so much of it!  Eat as much fresh as you can, because it’s never the same once out of the freezer.

Harvest before skin becomes dull and hard.  Pick zucchini frequently since it grows so fast; the smaller the better.  It can be frozen as cubes or shredded.  If cubed, peel if you wish and blanch it in boiling water or steam for 2 to 3 minutes.  Shredded zucchini need not be peeled or blanched.

Other summer squash is best cubed or sliced.  Peal first, and then blanch in boiling water or steam for 3 to 4 minutes.

Both will become somewhat watery when thawed, so strain in colander or strainer to drain off liquid if using in a mixed dish.  Thawing is not necessary when reheating for eating as is.

  • One of the best ways to freeze zucchini is to cook it with a small amount of water, some onions, and herbs.  Then purée it in a food processor and freeze in containers as an instant soup base.  When ready to prepare, thaw and mix with chicken broth and vegetables, or thin with milk and heat but do not boil.  Season with more herbs, if desired and pepper.

 

  • Here’s a good way to rid yourself of some of the guilt you feel when you discover the remains of last year’s garden in the corner of your freezer as you’re getting ready for this year’s harvest: Make soup stock.  Pour all those bags of green beans, spinach and carrots in a pot, add a few bay leaves and peppercorns cover with cold water, and slowly simmer for an hour or two.  If you’ve got some soup bones, so much the better.  You can use the stock right then, or you can slip it back into the freezer in its now-condensed form for later soup making.  Freeze in usable quantities, be it ice cubes or quart sizes.

 

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Timetable for Processing Low-Acid Vegetables

Such as ZUCCHINI AND SUMMER SQUASH

None of these are particularly good canned or frozen, but you can do both.  You can also pickle zucchini, and you will find a good recipe for pickles in this article.  Trust me, my mother used to hot pack and cold pack pickles; and we had to eat them.

RAW PACK.  Wash and slice; do not peel unless squash is large and skin is tough.  Cut into ½ inch slices and halve or quarter slices that are extra large in diameter.   Pack tightly in jars and cover with boiling water, leaving 1 inch at top.

HOT PACK.  Prepare as for raw pack. Cover with boiling water and b ring to a boil.  Drain, saving liquid.  Pack loosely and cover with hot liquid, leaving ½ inch at top.

 

Drying ZUCCHINI AND SUMMER SQUASH

Do not peel, but slice into thin strips and blanch 3 minutes.  If you’re making zucchini chips to eat right away, you needn’t bother blanching.  When dry, squash is leathery to brittle.

Temperatures and ventilation.  Maintaining a good, steady temperature is of critical importance when it comes to a good dried food.  To high a temperature and your food can quite literally cook.  What usually happens is that the food cooks on the outside, forming a dry skin that traps inside moisture.  This is called case hardening, and its best prevented by making sure temperatures don’t get too hot, especially in the first few hours of drying.  High temperatures, up near 145 deg. F, will kill off significant amounts of vitamins.  Lower temperatures save more vitamins, but if drying gets too low, down near 90 deg. F, will kill off significant amounts of vitamins.   Lower temperatures have more vitamins, but if drying gets too low, down near 90 deg. F. (and especially if conditions are humid), there’s greater chance of bacteria and mold growth.  Most commercial dryers are designed to keep food at a low-medium temperature of 50 deg to 130 deg. F. and this is a good target for homemade dryers and oven drying as well.

Fast, efficient drying, good ventilation is essential too.   The aim is not to heat the food, but to remove moisture from it.  The more warm dry air moving over the maximum surface area the better.  This is why the best drying trays are those that let air through, top and bottom, and also why dryers should be well ventilated, and why some commercial dryers have small fans built into them.

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DRYING OUTDOORS

The cheapest and usually easiest way to dry is to let the sun do all the work.  But drying outdoors works well only if you live in an area that enjoys long. Hot, sunny days of low humidity—and only if you live in an area that has clean, unpolluted air.  If you can’t depend upon about 3 good drying days in a row or if you live in an industrial area or near a heavily traveled highway—both of which usually mean poor air quality—perhaps you out to move on to the drying indoors.

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DRYING INDOORS

Many parts of the country are not blessed with many warm and dry days on a consistent basis.  If such is the case where you live, you’ll probably have more luck if you do your drying indoors.

Drying with controlled heat in a kitchen oven or in a dryer has several advantages.  The drying goes on day and night, in sunny or cloudy weather.  Controlled-heat dryers shorten the drying time and extend the drying season to include late-maturing varieties.  Vegetables dried with controlled heat cook up into more appetizing dishes than do sun-dried vegetables and have higher vitamin A content and a better color and flavor.  And you have no insects to worry about.

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OVEN DRYING

      Each square foot of shelf space in either an oven or a food dryer will hold about 1 to 2 pounds of produce, which comes out to be, for instance, a little more than q quart of peas or 4 medium-size apples.  Of course, the poundage depends upon how thick the slices of fruit or vegetables are.  Place food directly on oven racks, one piece deep, or, if the slats are too far apart, cover them first with finer wire cooling racks, cotton sheeting, or cheesecloth and then place the food on top.  Regular baking sheets can be used, but because they are solid, they will not expose the food to drying heat on all sides.  Special drying trays, either purchased or made of mesh or wooden slats for drying food in the sun, may also be used in the oven.

It’s very difficult to give more than general guidelines for time and temperature.  Set your oven no higher than 145 deg. F.  This will be tricky with most ovens since the lowest setting is often 200 Deg. F.  If this is the case with yours, set it to “warm” and an oven thermometer to check the real temperature inside.  If you can’t get the temperature to stay below 145 deg. F, you ought to consider other ways to dry food.  Food drying in the oven should be checked often, especially during the end of the drying time, and the trays should be rotated periodically for more even drying.  If your oven isn’t vented (and many electric ones aren’t), leave the oven door slightly ajar to get good air circulation.  Propping the door open just a bit with a folded towel or hot mat works well.  Move oven trays or oven racks from time to time.  Don‘t place any food closer than about 6 inches from either the top or bottom of your oven.  Turn your oven on bake; do not broil.  Some ovens use their broiling element even on bake, and if this is the case with yours, then deflect the broiler’s heat away from your food by placing a baking sheet or a sheet of aluminum foil on the uppermost shelf and keeping all your food on the shelves underneath this one.

Don’t overload your oven in an attempt to save energy.  Extra food just means extra drying time, and it might mean even longer drying time because of poor air circulation from crowded food.  Sliced fruits and vegetables and small whole berries can take from 4 to 12 hours to dry in a warm oven.

As when drying outside, put skin-side down.  By the time you’re ready to turn the fruit, the moister, exposed side should have dried out a bit and lost some of its trickiness, and there’s less chance that it will stick to the tray.

As oven is a handy place to dry food, and if you can keep the temperature below 145 deg. F, a perfectly acceptable place.  However, it’s not usually an economical means of drying big batches of food, since keeping the oven on with the door ajar for several hours at a time can use up a lot of energy.  But for an occasional batch of food, ovens are more reliable than drying outdoors and certainly cheaper than going out and buying a food dryer.

 

DON’T MICROWAVE YOUR FOOD DRY

Microwaves are good for many things, like blanching vegetables before you freeze or dry them.  But they are not particularly good for actually drying foods.  They are too hard to control, and there’s a good chance you’ll cook your food instead of drying it.

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HOME DRYERS

Zucchini, Summer Squash Stored at 70 deg. F. stores for about 1 month, stored at 52 deg. F.  for about 2 to 3 months. Not a good keeper and not as good a quality as other fruits and vegetables. 

Freeze—drying—Good, But not at home

Freeze-drying seems to be an excellent way to store foods.  The foods are substantially reduced in weight and volume and they will keep for about 2 years, without much loss of nutrients, color or flavor.  Unfortunately, freeze—drying is a sophisticate process that requires special equipment not available to most people.  It is not a technique that can be carried out under normal home situations.

Freeze—drying is a drying method in which water is removed from frozen foods. The food is first sliced, diced, powdered, granulated, or liquefied.  Then it is frozen.  Once frozen it is spread out on trays and placed in a vacuum cabinet.  The door is closed and the pressure is lowered, creating a vacuum.  Heat is applied, and the ice within the food disappears in the air and is taken out of the cabinet with a pump.  Drying takes about 10 hours (during drying the food is frozen) and almost all of the water is removed from the food.  The moisture content is usually 2 percent or lower.  The food is taken from the drying chamber and tightly packaged in a can so it will stay dry until used.

Dried foods keep well for a month to 2 years, depending upon the food.  Again, zucchini, summer squash are not good keepers, and do not keep well.  Perhaps you could dry zucchini or summer squash; but, you may be able to use them for things like zucchini bread, cakes and/or cookies.

I love zucchini!  During the summer months it produces abundantly.  As explained earlier in this article.  I freeze it and use it later in the year.  I also serve it as a vegetable on the dinner table.  You can also successfully back cookies, cakes and bread with zucchini.  Recipes above.  It is great!  My family loves them throughout the year.

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Preparing freeze—dried or dried zucchini or summer squash for the dinner table.

Soak equal amounts of squash and water for 15 minutes, then steam for 8 minutes.  Good flavor and color; limp but not mushy.

 

REFRIGERATOR ZUCCHINI PICKLES

Stocking Up III – Classic Preserving Guide by Carol Hupping and the staff of Rodale Food Center

Refrigerator Zucchini

The sun “cooks” these quick

4          pounds small zucchini

1          pound small white onions

1          quart cider vinegar

1          cup honey

2          teaspoons celery seeds

2          teaspoons turmeric

2          teaspoons dry mustard

2          teaspoons mustard seeds    

 

            Cut unpeeled zucchini into thin slices, like cucumbers.  Peel onions and slice thin.  In an enamel or stainless steel saucepan combine remaining ingredients.  Bring to a boil and pour over vegetables.  Let stand 1 hour.  Return to heat, bring to a boil, and cook 2 minutes.  Pour into hot scalded jars.  Cover tightly and refrigerate.

Return to heat, bring to a boil, and cook 3 minutes.  Pour into hot, scalded jars.  Cover tightly and refrigerate.

Yield: 4 servings

 

 

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GIANT STUFFED SQUASH

To Freeze

Stocking Up III – Classic Preserving Guide by Carol Hupping and the staff of Rodale Food Center

To freeze:

1          egg

1          large clove garlic, crushed

1          cup whole wheat bread crumbs

1          giant zucchini, at least 1 food long

1          tablespoon wheat germ      

1          tablespoon vegetable oil

1          large onion, chopped

1          sweet red or green pepper, chopped

2          small carrots, diced any small amount (about ¼ pound) vegetables on hand-mushrooms, kohlrabi, string beans, cucumbers

1          very ripe tomato, diced

3          tablespoons tomato paste

1          teaspoon ground oregano

1          teaspoon ground basil

¼         cup chopped walnuts

½         pound cheddar cheese, shredded

 

            Preheat oven to 350 deg. F.

Beat egg with garlic.  Add bread Crumbs

Halve zucchini lengthwise, scrape out seed cavity, and sprinkle with wheat germ.  Spread egg mixture over remaining cut surface.  Pace zucchini on a rack set over a pan of water and steam in the oven about 10 minutes.

Heat oil; sauté onions, pepper, carrots, and on-hand vegetables until onions are limp and transparent.  Add tomatoes, tomato paste, oregano, and basil.  Drain.  Fill zucchini shells with the vegetable mixture.  Top with chopped walnuts, and cover with cheese.

To freeze, place filled squash halve on tray in freezer.  When frozen wrap and return to freezer.

When ready to serve, preheat oven to 350 deg. F.  Bake thawed squash on a rack over a baking sheet for about 35 minutes or until cheese melts and squash is tender.  Cut into thick slices to serve.

Yield: 4 servings as a main dish or 8 servings as a side dish.

 

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GIANT STUFFED SQUASH

To Freeze

Stocking Up III – Classic Preserving Guide by Carol Hupping and the staff of Rodale Food Center

To freeze:

1          egg

1          large clove garlic, crushed

1          cup whole wheat bread crumbs

1          giant zucchini, at least 1 food long

1          tablespoon wheat germ      

1          tablespoon vegetable oil

1          large onion, chopped

1          sweet red or green pepper, chopped

2          small carrots, diced any small amount (about ¼ pound) vegetables on hand-mushrooms, kohlrabi, string beans, cucumbers

1          very ripe tomato, diced

3          tablespoons tomato paste

1          teaspoon ground oregano

1          teaspoon ground basil

¼         cup chopped walnuts

½         pound cheddar cheese, shredded

 

            Preheat oven to 350 deg. F.

Beat egg with garlic.  Add bread Crumbs

Halve zucchini lengthwise, scrape out seed cavity, and sprinkle with wheat germ.  Spread egg mixture over remaining cut surface.  Pace zucchini on a rack set over a pan of water and steam in the oven about 10 minutes.

Heat oil; sauté onions, pepper, carrots, and on-hand vegetables until onions are limp and transparent.  Add tomatoes, tomato paste, oregano, and basil.  Drain.  Fill zucchini shells with the vegetable mixture.  Top with chopped walnuts, and cover with cheese.

To freeze, place filled squash halve on tray in freezer.  When frozen wrap and return to freezer.

When ready to serve, preheat oven to 350 deg. F.  Bake thawed squash on a rack over a baking sheet for about 35 minutes or until cheese melts and squash is tender.  Cut into thick slices to serve.

Yield: 4 servings as a main dish or 8 servings as a side dish.

           

Yield: 4 pints or 2 quarts

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SPICED SQUASH PURE’E

(To Freeze)

Stocking Up III – Classic Preserving Guide by Carol Hupping and the staff of Rodale Food Center

To freeze:

This tasty alternative to applesauce enhances roast pork and lamb.

12        cups peeled, seed, shredded squash (use yellow, acorn, crooked neck, or whatever you have on hand; 6 to 8 pounds)

12        ounces apple juice concentrate

1          teaspoon ground cinnamon

1          teaspoon ground ginger

 

            Combine all ingredients in a large, heavy-bottom saucepan and simmer until liquid is evaporated and squash is translucent.

Allow to cool, then purée in a food processor, blender, or food mill.  Pack into containers and freeze.

When reheating, add 2 to 3 tablespoons water if consistency is too thick.

 Yield: 3 pints

Variation: Substitute 1 ½ teaspoons Chinese Five Spice Powder (available in Asian food markets) for cinnamon, allspice, and ginger.

 

Know your Ingredients

June 20th, 2012

 

Know your Ingredients

 

 

Food Storage

 

 

ABOUT STOCKS AND STOCK SUBSTITUTES

        ”  Antique dealers may respond hopefully to dusty bits in attics, but true cooks palpitate over even more curious oddments: mushroom and tomato skins, fowl carcasses, tender celery leaves, knucklebones, fish heads and chicken feet.  These are just a few of the treasures for the stock pot – that magic source from which comes the telling character of the cuisine.  The juices made and saved from meat and vegetable cookery are so important that in France they are called bases of “fonds” you will note in the recipes for gravies, aspics, soups or sauces, the insistent call for stocks.  While these need not always be heavily reduced ones; do experiment by tasting the wonderful difference when these liquids replace water.  When stocks are specified in long-cooking recipes, they are always meat stocks, as vegetable and fish stocks deteriorate in flavor under prolonged cooking.

You will want to store separately and use very sparingly certain strongly flavored waters, like cabbage, carrot, turnip and bean or those from starchy vegetables, if the soup is to be a clear one,  you may want to look at the liquids in which modern hams, tongues  have been cooked because of the many chemicals now used in curing.  You will, of course, never want to use the cooking water from an “old” ham.  You will certainly isolate, even through you may treasure them, any light—fleshed fish and shell-fish residues.  Fish and vegetable stocks with vegetable oils are important in “au gras” or meat and meat-fat based cooking.  But, whether you are a purist who uses only beef-based stock with beef or chicken with chicken or whether you experiment with less classic combinations, for both nutrient values and taste dividends – do save and make stocks.

STOCK-MAKING

While we beg you to utilize the kitchen oddments described with Household stock, we become more aware that the neat packaged meats and vegetables most of us get at the supermarket give us an increasing minimum of trimmings.  The rabbits, old pheasants and hens that make for such picturesque reading in ancient stock recipes – fairly thrusting in ancient stock recipes—fairly thrusting the hunter and farmer laden with earthy bounty straight in the kitchen—have given way to a well-picked-over turkey carcass and a specially purchased soup bunch.  But even these are worthwhile.  Stock—making is an exception to almost every other kind of cooking.  Instead of calling for things young and tender—recalling for things young and tender—remember that meat from aged animals and mature vegetables will be most flavorsome.  Remember, too, that instead of making every effort to keep juices within the materials you are cooking, you want to extract and trap every vestige of flavor from them—into liquid form.  So—soaking in cold water and starting to cook in cold juices—are the first steps to your goal; but have the ingredients to be cooked and the water at the same temperature at the onset of cooking.  Bones are cut up or crushed; meat is trimmed of excess fat and cut up; and vegetables, after cleaning, may even be blended.

SEASONINGS FOR STOCKS AND SOUPS

These all-important ingredients should be – addend sparingly in the initial cooking of soups and stocks and the seasoning should be corrected just before the soup is served.

Never salt heavily at the beginning of stock-making.  The great reduction both in original cooking and in subsequent cooking – if the stock is used as an ingredient—makes it almost impossible to judge the amount you will need.   A little extra salt can so easily ruin your results.  If stocks are stored, the slat and seasoning are apt to intensify and – if a little extra salt is added the salt flavor will be increased.

The discreet use of either fresh or dried herbs or spices is imperative.  Use whole spices like peppercorns, allspice, corianders and celery seeds and bay leaf—but not too much.  Add mace, paprika and cayenne in the stingiest pinches.  Be sure to use a Bouquet Garnet, for a quick soup, try a chiffonade.  An onion stuck with two or three cloves is de rigueur and if available, add one or two leeks.  Monosodium glutamate is a great help when the flavor of the stock is thin.

In making dark stocks, browning a portion of the meat or roasting it until brown, but not scorched, will add flavor.

For a strong meat stock, allow only 2 cups of water to every cup of lean meat and bone.  They may be used in about equal weights.  When this much meat is used, only a very few vegetables are needed to give flavor to the soup.

Bones, especially marrow bones and ones with gelatinous extractives, play a very important role in stock.  But if a too large proportion of them is used, the stock becomes gluey and is reserved for use in gravies and sauces.  Raw and cooked bones should not be mixed if a clear stock is desired.  Nor, for this reason, should any starchy or very greasy foods be added to the stock pot.  And starch foods also tend to make the stock sour rapidly.

Before you put the browned meat and the cooking herbs in the pot, discard any fat that may have been extracted.  The factor that retains the flavor of the extracted juices; most, is to have a steady low heat for the simmering of the brew.  You may laugh at the following primitive suggestion.  But it is my answer to the thinness of modern pots and the passing of precious source of household heat, “the precious source of household heat, “the back of the stove” now seldom found in modern equipment.  Turn the stove top burner at the very lowest setting and if necessary leave the lid off the pot to prevent it from boiling over.  You need then have no worries about boiling over or about disturbing the steady, long, simmering rhythm.   Or when  choosing a heavy stock pot, avoid aluminum, as it will affect the clarity of the stock.

As the stock heats, quite a heavy scum rises to the surface.  If a clear soup is wanted it is imperative to skim this foamy aluminous material before the first half hour of cooking.  After the last skimming, wipe the edge of the stock pot at the level of the soup.

Simmer the stock, partially covered, with the lid at an angle, until you are sure you have extracted all the goodness for the ingredients – over 2 hours and at least 12 if bones are used.  To keep the soup clear, drain it, not by pouring but by ladling.  Or use a stock pot with a spigot.  Then strain it through 2 layers of cheesecloth that have been wrong out is water.  Cool it uncovered.  Store it tightly covered and refrigerated.  The grease will rise in a solid mass; which, is also a protective coating.  Do not remove this until you are ready to reheat the stock for serving or use.

Stocks keep 3 to 4 days refrigerated.  Freeze for longer periods of time.  The best practice is to bring them to a boil at the end of this period and cool before re-storing.  It is also good practice to boil them if adding other pot liquors to them.  I find this unnecessary, however, if the quantities are small or the stock is to be used within a few days.

CLARIFYING STOCK

Using care with the above method of making stock, it should be so clear that you need not clarify it.  If, however, you want an extra sparkling stock for aspic, consommé or chaud-froid—clarification; which,  is a demanding process, is necessary.  There are two ways to do this.  One is a quick clearing with egg white and shells; the other is both a clearing and strengthening procedure.  But the purpose of each is the same—to remove any cloudiness or imperfections from the liquid.  Be sure the stock to be clarified has been well degreased.

For the first method, allow to each quart of broth 1 slightly beaten—egg white and 1crumpled shell.  If the stock to be clarified has not been fully cooled and is still lukewarm; also, add a few ice cubes for each quart.  Stir the eggs and ice into the soup well.  Bring the soup very, very slowly without stirring, just to a simmer.  As the soup heats, the egg brings to the top a heavy, crusty foam, over an inch thick.  Do not skim this, but push it very gently away from one side of the pan.  Through this small opening, you can watch the movement of the simmering—to make sure no true boiling takes place.  Continue simmering 10 to 15 minutes.  Move the pot carefully from the heat source and let it stand 10 minutes to 1 hour.  Wring out a cloth in hot water and suspend it, like a jelly bag, above a large pan.  Again push the scummy crust to one side and ladle the soup carefully so it drains through the cloth.  Cool it uncovered.  Store it covered tightly and refrigerate.

The second method of clarification produces a double-strength stock for consommé.  Add to each quart of degreased stock 1/6 to ¼ lb. of lean ground beef, 1 egg white and crumpled shell and to the pot several uncooked fowl  carcasses; and, if the stock is beef, fresh tomato skins.  Some cooks also use a few vegetables.  Beat these additions into the stock.  Then very slowly, bring the pot just to a simmer.  If true boiling is reached, the clarification is ruined.  Simmer for 15 to 20 minutes.  Remove from stove and skim the pot.  When the brew reaches about 70 deg. start over again and use an egg white and shell for each quart of stock to be clarified.  Proceed as for quick clarification, but allow the simmer to last up to 2 hours.  Then remove the pot from the heat source  and let it rest an hour or more.  Ladle and strain it, as previously described.  Cool it uncovered.  Store it tightly covered and refrigerated.


 

CLARIFYING STOCK     I                                                         About 2 quarts

Brown Stock I

Cut in pieces and brown in a 350 deg oven:

6 lbs. shin and marrow bones

Place them in a large stock pot with:

4 quarts water

8 black peppercorns

6 whole cloves

1 bay leaf

1 teaspoon thyme

3 sprigs parsley

1 large diced carrot

3 diced stalks celery

1 cup drained canned or fresh tomatoes

1 medium diced onion

1 small, white turnip

Bring to boil. Reduce heat and simmer, uncovered, for 2 ½ to 3 hours or until reduced by half.  Strain stock.  Cool uncovered and refrigerate.

Correct the seasoning

CLARIFYING STOCK     II.                                                      About 3 ½ cups

While Brown Stock 1 is more strongly flavored and cleared, do not scorn stocks made from cooked meats and bones.

Cut the meat from the bones.

2 cups cooked meat and bones

Add, in a heavy stock pot:

4 or 5 cups water

¼ teaspoon salt

1 cup chopped vegetables (carrots, turnips, celery, parsley, etc.)

1 small onion

1 cup tomatoes

½ teaspoon sugar

2 peppercorns

¼ teaspoon celery salt

Bring the soup just to the boiling point, turn down the heat and simmer, uncovered, for 11/2 hours.  Strain the soup, shill it.  For quick chilling.  Place it in a tall narrow container set in cold water.  Remove the fat and reheat the soup.

          Correct the seasoning.

 


 

VEAL STOCK                                                                           about 2 quarts

Please read: ABOUT STOCKS AND STOCK SUBSTITUTES 1st article in this series.

 

4 lbs. veal knuckles or 3 lbs. veal knuckles and 1 lb. beef

Drain and discard water and add meat and bones to:

4 quarts cold water

8 white peppercorns

1 bay leaf

1 teaspoons thyme

6 whole cloves

6 parsley stems

1 medium dices onion

3 stalks diced celery

1 medium diced carrot

Bring to a boil.  Reduce heat at once to a simmer and cook 2 ½ to 3 hours or until reduced by half.  Strain stock and cool uncovered.

 

Correct the seasoning

QUICK STOCK                                                               4 TO 6 Servings

Wash and cut into 1-inch cubes:

2 lbs. lean beef (soup meat)

Brown it slowly in the pressure cooker in:

1 tablespoons melted fat

Drain off the fat. Add:

1 quart boiling water

           A cracked soup bone.

          1 medium sliced onion

          1 diced carrots

          4 diced stalk celery with tender leaves

          ½ bay leaf

          2 peppercorns

          ½ teaspoon salt

Do not have the pressure cooker more than ½ full.  Adjust the cover and cook at 15 pounds pressure for 30 minutes.  Reduce pressure instantly.  Strain.  Cool – uncovered

 

Correct the seasoning

 

QUICK HOUSEHOLD STOCK

A careful section of refrigerator oddments can often produce enough valid ingredients to make up a flavorful stock to use as a reinforcer for soups – canned, dried, freeze dried and frozen – and in gravies and sauces.  This will make a darker, cloudier stock—by using both cooked and uncooked meats.  Put in a pressure cooker:

          1 cup nonfat meat, bone and vegetables, cooked and uncooked

          1 to 1 ½ cups water

Use the smaller amount of water if you are short on meat.  For vegetables to include.   Do not fill the pressure cooker more than ½ full.  If raw meat and bones are included,

Add:

2 tablespoons vinegar

Cook them first 10 minutes at 15 lbs. pressure.  Add the other food and cook 10 to 15 minutes longer.

 

 

 

 

 

CHICKEN STOCK

I.                                                                                    ABOUT 2 QUARTS

Blanch:       4 lbs. chicken backs, necks, wings and feet

Drain, discard water and bring the chicken slowly to a boil in:

4 Quarts cold water with:

8 white peppercorns

1 bay leaf

1 teaspoon thyme

6 whole cloves

6 parsley stems

1 medium diced onion

3 diced stalks celery

1 medium dices carrot

Reduce the heat at once and simmer 2 ½ to 3 hours or until reduced by half.  Strain stock – cool uncovered and refrigerate until ready to use.

 

 

FOWL, RABBIT OR GAME STOCK 1.                          About 9 to 10 cups.

Put in a heavy pot:

4 or 5 lbs. fowl or rabbit

          3 quarts cold water

          5 celery ribs with leaves

          ½ celery ribs and leaves

          ½ bay leaf

          ½ cup chopped onion

          ½ cup chopped carrots

          6 sprigs Parsley

 Simmer the stock for 2 ½ hours, uncovered.  Strain it.  Chill it.  It will solidify and make a good aspic or jellied soup.  Degrease it before serving.

 

FOWL, RABBIT OR GAME STOCK 2                  About 11/2 to 2½ Cups

The housewife frequently meets up with the leavings of a party bird from which a good stock can be made.  Try this simpler soup when you have left over cooked chicken, duck or turkey.  Break into small pieces:

1 cooked chicken, duck or turkey carcass

Add and simmer – partially covered, for about 1 ½ hours:

4 to 6 cups water

The amount of liquid will depend on the size and number of carcasses you use.  Add also to one pot:

1 cup chopped celery with tender leaves

          1 large sliced onion

          ½ cup chopped carrot lettuce leaves

          ½ bay leaf

          3 to 4 peppercorns

                   Parsley

                   A Bouquet Garn,

Strain and chill it.  Degrease before serving.

 

It is very important to taste the vegetable liquors you reserve.  They  very  tremendously  depending on the age of the vegetable and whether the leaves are dark outer ones or light inner ones.  Green celery tops, for instance can become bitter through long cooking in a soup, while the tender yellowish leaves do not.  Often, too, celery is so heavily sprayed with chemicals that the outer leaves and tops taste strongly enough of these absorbed flavors to carry over into foods. Nutritionists recommend the out leaves of vegetables because of their greater vitamin content.  Eat these raw in salads, where the bitterness is not accented as it is in soups.”

 

Irma S. Rombauer Joy of Cooking 1939

http://tinyurl.com/87xkezb

When I was a little girl Irma S. Rombauer Joy of Cooking 1939 was my favorite book.  I loved to watch my mother cook.


FRENCH CREAM PIE

April 1st, 2010

2              CUPS MILK

(may substitute reconstituted powdered milk  or canned milk diluted with 1 cup water.)

½             CUP SUGAR

½             TEASPOON SALT

2              TABLESPOONS CORNSTARCH

3              EGGS, SEPARATED

(may substitute reconstituted powdered eggs whites &  reconstituted egg yokes or  whole eggs.)

1/3         CUP SUGAR

½             TEASPOON RUM OR VANILLA

                CHILLED GRAHAM CRACKER CRUST (RECIPE TO FOLLOW)

                Scald 1 ½ cup of milk in top of double boiler.  Blend the ½ cup sugar, salt and cornstarch with the remaining cold milk to for a smooth paste, and add gradually with constant stirring to the scalded milk.  Cook over boiling water until thickened and smooth, stirring frequently, about 10 minutes.  Beat egg yolks slightly and add part of the hot mixture, stir well, then return to double boiler.  Cook 2 minutes longer with constant stirring.  Keep hot.  Then beat egg whites until stiff. Gradually add the 1/3 cup sugar, 1 tablespoon at a time, and continue to beat until thick and smooth.  Fold ½ of this meringue into the hot cream filling and add the flavoring.  Turn into the chilled crust.  Top with remaining meringue, piling it lightly and quickly on the filling, and being sure to touch edges of crust all around.  Bake in moderate oven (350 degrees F.) 12 to 15 minutes or until delicately browned.  Cool on cake rack before serving.  5 to 6 servings.

March 10th, 2010

 

When I Say that Food Is Interchangeable This Is What I Am Talking About.

 

 

  From the recipe of “Cookin’ with Home Storage” by Vicki Tate.  My Favorite Rice Pudding

1            Cup rice  (May substitute brown rice.)

½           Cup butter

2            Cups water

4            Eggs 

1            Tsp. cinnamon

1            Tsp. vanilla

2            Quarts milk

1            Cup sugar (May substitute ¾ Cup Honey.)

              Nutmeg as desired.

 

Cook rice in water and salt for 7 minutes.  Add milk and butter to rice and simmer 1 ½ hours (add raisins if desired during last ½ hour of cooking.)  After cooking, beat eggs, vanilla and sugar.  Fold carefully into hot rice mixture.  Put into a serving dish and sprinkle with nutmet.

 

Recipe from Elaine Harmston.

 

(Substitute according to what you have and according to your families tastes.)

 

Whole Wheat Bread

February 9th, 2010

Visit our Book Store.

  Southern Utah Food Storage Book Store

Blend or mix on speed 2 for 2 minutes

6 cups Warm/Hot Water
2/3 cup Oil
2/3 cup Honey

Add:
2 Tbsp Dough Enhancer
2 cups Whole Wheat Flour
1/3 cup Vital Wheat Gluten

Blend and Knead
Add Slowly 9 cups whole wheat flour until sides
of bowl are clean.

Shape: Into loaf pans and let rise until double.
Bake:   At 350 degrees for 30 to 40 minutes

Southern Utah Food Storage Book Store

My Family Loves Homemade Baked Goods Don’t You

June 29th, 2013

meringue pie

Uses for Baking Soda

From Auguson Farms – Bakery

 

Auguson Farms TM offers free a wide selection of baking mixes and baking items.  Whether you’re preparing baking goods from scratch or want a quick baking mix, the provide for your needs.

On their labels you will also find recipes you can use for using their products and they are delicious.

I am posting for your use some of the recipes that are some of my products I have purchased from Auguson Farms.  I have used these recipes and my family likes the finished products. This is not a commercial add.  My family enjoyed the finished products they ate with Auguson Farms products.

 

“Easy Sugar Cookies

2 ¾ cups flour

1 teaspoon Baking Soda

½ teaspoon baking powder

1 cup butter – softened

1 ½ cups sugar

1 egg

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

In small bowl combine flour, baking soda, and baking powder.  Set aside.  In a large bowl cream together butter and sugar until smooth, add egg and vanilla. Gradually blend in dry ingredients.  Roll rounded teaspoon of dough into balls and place onto ungreased cookie sheets.

Bake at 375 deg.F. for 8 to 10 minutes. Remove and cool on wire racks.

 

“Banana Cake

1/4 cup sour cream

1 teaspoon Baking Soda

¼ cup butter – softened

1 ½ cup sugar

2 eggs

1 large banana – mashed

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 ½ cups flour

Grease 9” pan, dust with flour. Combine sour cream and baking soda in large bowl; let stand for 5 minutes. Mix butter, sugar, and eggs together in separate bowl; stir into sour cream mixture.  Add mashed banana; mix well.  Gradually add vanilla and flour; mix well after each addition.  Pour batter into loaf pan, bake at 350 deg.F for 1 hour.  Cool in pan on wire rack for 10 minutes, then turn out onto rack; cool complete before frosting.

 

Auguson Farms

432 West 3440 South

Salt Lake City, Utah 84115- 2011

1-800-878-0099

www.augusonfarms.com

Blue Chip Group, Inc., makers of Morning Moo’s

 

 

 

“Eggs & Dairy

Powdered egg products provide all the wholesome goodness of regular eggs, but with the convenience of a long shelf life.  All of Auguson Farms’ egg products are USDA inspected and approved. Their dairy products contain protein, have a long lasting shelf life and require no refrigeration until mixed.

Butter Powder

Auguson Farms’ Butter Powder is ideal for any recipe that calls for butter and blends easily with other dry ingredients.

 

Apple Crum Cake

Cake

3 cups flour

2 teaspoon Baking Powder

1/3 cup Auguson Farms Whole Eggs

1 ¾ cups water

1 ½ cups sugar

½ cup shortening

1 ½ teaspoons salt

1 cup Auguson Farms Apple slices – chopped & rehydrated

 

In large bowl, blend all ingredients and mix well.  Pour into a greased 9×13” baking dish.

 

Topping

2/3 cup brown sugar

¾ cup Auguson Farms Butter Powder

2 tablespoons water

½ cup flour

1 teaspoon cinnamon

In small bowl, mix all topping ingredients with fork and crumbly. Sprinkle crumb topping on top of cake.  Bake at 375 deg.F. for 25-30 minutes. Remove and cool on wire racks.

 

Pie Crust

2cups all-purpose flour

1 cup cake flour

2 tablespoons Augason Farms Butter Powder

1 cup shortening

1 whole egg

1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar

½ teaspoon salt

1/3 cup ice water

In large mixing bowl, combine the flours and butter powder.  Cut in shortening using a pastry blender or fork until it resembles course crumbs.  Set aside. In small bowl, beat egg, vinegar, salt and coarse crumbs.  Add egg mixture to the flour mixture and combine with fork until the dough comes together.  Do not over mix.  Form dough into a disk, wrap in plastic, and chill for several hours.  Using a little more than 1/3 of the dough, roll out between 2 pieces plastic wrap to a size that will overlap the edge of a 9” pie plate.   Fit dough in pie plate, trip off excess.  Add your favorite filling. Roll out remaining dough to fit the top.  Place dough over filling.  Cut off excess and crisp edges to seal the dough. Brush the top with milk and sprinkle with sugar.  Cut 3 or 4 slits for steam vents. Place on bottom self of oven, bake at 400 degs. F. for 10 minutes.  Move to the middle shelf, reduce heat to 300 deg. F. and bake until crust is golden brown, about 30-35 minutes.  Cool completely before cutting.

Come listen to living prophets

May 15th, 2013

I Love to Bake Goodies For My Family. Do You?

April 22nd, 2013

meringue pie

 

Uses for Baking Soda From Auguson Farms – Bakery Auguson Farms TM offers free a wide selection of baking mixes and baking items. Whether you’re preparing baking goods from scratch or want a quick baking mix, the provide for your needs. On their labels you will also find recipes you can use for using their products and they are delicious. I am posting for your use some of the recipes that are some of my products I have purchased from Auguson Farms. I have used these recipes and my family likes the finished products. This is not a commercial add. My family enjoyed the finished products they ate with Auguson Farms products.

“Easy Sugar Cookies

2 ¾ cups flour 1 teaspoon Baking Soda

½ teaspoon baking powder 1 cup butter – softened

1 ½ cups sugar

1 egg

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

In small bowl combine flour, baking soda, and baking powder. Set aside. In a large bowl cream together butter and sugar until smooth, add egg and vanilla. Gradually blend in dry ingredients. Roll rounded teaspoon of dough into balls and place onto ungreased cookie sheets.

Bake at 375 deg.F. for 8 to 10 minutes.

Remove and cool on wire racks.

 

Banana Cake

1/4 cup sour cream

1 teaspoon Baking Soda ¼ cup butter – softened

1 ½ cup sugar

2 eggs 1 large banana – mashed

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 ½ cups flour

Grease 9” pan, dust with flour. Combine sour cream and baking soda in large bowl; let stand for 5 minutes. Mix butter, sugar, and eggs together in separate bowl; stir into sour cream mixture. Add mashed banana; mix well. Gradually add vanilla and flour; mix well after each addition. Pour batter into loaf pan, bake at 350 deg.F for 1 hour.

Cool in pan on wire rack for 10 minutes, then turn out onto rack; cool complete before frosting.

Auguson Farms 432 West 3440 South Salt Lake City, Utah 84115- 2011 1-800-878-0099 www.augusonfarms.com

Blue Chip Group, Inc., makers of Morning Moo’s “Eggs & Dairy Powdered egg products provide all the wholesome goodness of regular eggs, but with the convenience of a long shelf life. All of Auguson Farms’ egg products are USDA inspected and approved. Their dairy products contain protein, have a long lasting shelf life and require no refrigeration until mixed.

Butter Powder Auguson Farms’ Butter Powder is ideal for any recipe that calls for butter and blends easily with other dry ingredients.

 

Apple Crum Cake Cake

3 cups flour

2 teaspoon Baking Powder

1/3 cup Auguson Farms Whole Eggs

1 ¾ cups water

1 ½ cups sugar

½ cup shortening

1 ½ teaspoons salt

1 cup Auguson Farms Apple slices – chopped & rehydrated In large bowl, blend all ingredients and mix well. Pour into a greased 9×13” baking dish.

Topping

2/3 cup brown sugar

¾ cup Auguson Farms Butter Powder

2 tablespoons water

½ cup flour

1 teaspoon cinnamon

In small bowl, mix all topping ingredients with fork and crumbly. Sprinkle crumb topping on top of cake. Bake at 375 deg.F. for 25-30 minutes. Remove and cool on wire racks.

 

Pie Crust

2cups all-purpose flour

1 cup cake flour

2 tablespoons Augason Farms Butter Powder

1 cup shortening

1 whole egg

1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar

½ teaspoon salt

1/3 cup ice water

 

In large mixing bowl, combine the flours and butter powder. Cut in shortening using a pastry blender or fork until it resembles course crumbs. Set aside. In small bowl, beat egg, vinegar, salt and coarse crumbs. Add egg mixture to the flour mixture and combine with fork until the dough comes together. Do not over mix. Form dough into a disk, wrap in plastic, and chill for several hours. Using a little more than 1/3 of the dough, roll out between 2 pieces plastic wrap to a size that will overlap the edge of a 9” pie plate. Fit dough in pie plate, trip off excess. Add your favorite filling. Roll out remaining dough to fit the top. Place dough over filling. Cut off excess and crisp edges to seal the dough. Brush the top with milk and sprinkle with sugar. Cut 3 or 4 slits for steam vents. Place on bottom self of oven, bake at 400 degs. F. for 10 minutes. Move to the middle shelf, reduce heat to 300 deg. F. and bake until crust is golden brown, about 30-35 minutes. Cool completely before cutting.

 

http://www.mypatriotsupply.com/?Click=27606Emergency_Survival_Food_s/104.htm

 

colonial-minutemen-5v1

 

My Favorite Food – Breads My Favorite Food

April 1st, 2013

 

Home Made Bread 

 

levening agent baking powder

 

www.mypatriotsupply.com/?click+2766

http://tinyurl.com/a7pc4xy

 

My Favorite Food – Breads

 

                                                                        

Bread and Rolls

Baking Powder may be used instead of yeast to leaven bread.  It does the same work; that is, raises the bread dough, making it porous and spongy.  The great advantage in baking powder bread is in time saved.  Royal Baking Powder bread can be mixed and baked in about an hour and a half.

Baking Powder Bread

4 cups flour

1 teaspoon salt                                                                                                                     

1 tablespoon sugar

7 teaspoons baking powder

1 medium-sized, cold boiled potato milk (water may be used.)

 

          Sift together flour, slat, sugar and baking powder, rub in potato; add sufficient milk to mix smoothly into stiff batter.  Turn at once into greased loaf pan, smooth top with knife dipped in melted butter, and allow to stand in warm place about 30 minutes.  Bake in moderate oven about one hour.  When done take from pan, moisten top with few drops cold water and allow to cool before putting away in bread box.

 

 Home Made Bread

 

Smelling baked goods in the form of bread

Boston Brown Bread

1 cup entire wheat or graham flour

1 cup corn meal

1 cup rye meal or ground rolled oats

5 teaspoons Baking Powder

1 teaspoon salt

¾ cup molasses

1 1/3 cup milk

          Mix thoroughly dry ingredients; add molasses to milk, and add to dry ingredients; beat thoroughly and put into greased moulds 2/3 full.  Steam 3 ½ hours; remove covers and bake until top is dry.  

 

Smelling baked goods in the form of bread.

 

Spider Corn Bread

1 egg

1 ¾ cup milk

1 cup corn meal

1/3 cup flour

2 teaspoon salt

2 tablespoons Baking Powder

1 tablespoon shortening

          Beat egg and add one cup milk; stir in corn meal, flour, sugar, salt and baking powder; which, have been sifted together; torn into frying pan in which shortening has been melted; pour on remainder of milk but do not stir.  Bake about 25 minutes in hot over.  There should be a line of creamy custard through the bread.  Cut into triangles and serve.

 

           Corn Bread

1 cup corn meal

1 cup flour

4 teaspoons baking powder

3 tablespoons sugar

1 teaspoon salt

1 ½ cups milk

2 tablespoons melted shortening

1 egg

          Mix and sift dry ingredients; add milk, shortening and beaten egg; beat well and pour into greased shallow pan.  Bake in hot oven about 25 minutes.

www.mypatriotsupply.com/?click+2766

http://tinyurl.com/a7pc4xy

My Favorite Food – Breads My Favorite Food – Breads Bread and Rolls Baking Powder may be used instead of yeast to leaven bread. It does the same work; that is, raises the bread dough, making it porous and spongy.

The great advantage in baking powder bread is in time saved. Baking Powder bread can be mixed and baked in about an hour and a half. Baking Powder Bread

4 cups flour

1 teaspoon salt

1 tablespoon sugar

7 teaspoons baking powder

1 medium-sized, cold boiled potato milk (water may be used.)

Sift together flour, slat, sugar and baking powder, rub in potato; add sufficient milk to mix smoothly into stiff batter.

Turn at once into greased loaf pan, smooth top with knife dipped in melted butter, and allow to stand in warm place about 30 minutes.

Bake in moderate oven about one hour.

When done take from pan, moisten top with few drops cold water and allow to cool before putting away in bread box.

 

Smelling baked goods in the form of bread Boston Brown Bread

1 cup entire wheat or graham flour

1 cup corn meal

1  cup rye meal or ground rolled oats

5 teaspoons Baking Powder

1 teaspoon salt

¾ cup molasses

1- 1/3 cup milk

Mix thoroughly dry ingredients; add molasses to milk, and add to dry ingredients; beat thoroughly and put into greased moulds 2/3 full.

Steam 3 ½ hours; remove covers and bake until top is dry. Smelling baked goods in the form of bread.

 

Spider Corn Bread 1 egg 1 ¾ cup milk 1 cup corn meal 1/3 cup flour 2 teaspoon salt 2 tablespoons Baking Powder 1 tablespoon shortening Beat egg and add one cup milk; stir in corn meal, flour, sugar, salt and baking powder; which, have been sifted together; torn into frying pan in which shortening has been melted; pour on remainder of milk but do not stir. Bake about 25 minutes in hot over. There should be a line of creamy custard through the bread. Cut into triangles and serve. Corn Bread 1 cup corn meal 1 cup flour 4 teaspoons baking powder 3 tablespoons sugar 1 teaspoon salt 1 ½ cups milk 2 tablespoons melted shortening 1 egg Mix and sift dry ingredients; add milk, shortening and beaten egg; beat well and pour into greased shallow pan. Bake in hot oven about 25 minutes.

www.mypatriotsupply.com/?click+2766  http://tinyurl.com/a7pc4xy  

La Grand & Emma Hunt — Phone no: 435-231-1301 As concerns for the future mount, smart citizens are preparing for the worst. In these uncertain times, the concept of starting a survival garden and keeping an emergency seed bank on hand has become more widespread over the last several years.

My Patriot Supply Flyers-4 Heritage seeds

 

 

 

More and more families are gaining food independence by establishing survival gardens featuring non-hybrid emergency seeds. These seeds are not genetically modified and can thrive in even the harshest soil conditions, making them the ultimate survival garden seeds. The health benefits of non-gmo seeds are more widely recognized – more now than ever – and people are taking a stand against high super market prices. Just because you want the best for your family, doesn’t mean you have to pay a premium on your family’s emergency seed bank.

 When disaster appears eminent, you have to ask yourself a critical question: Can I feed my family from the garden if I have to? Do I have the right kind of seeds for my region? Can I save my survival garden seeds from my harvest to plant the following year?

 

Survival Seed Vault

 

Self Reliance

Food Independence

The Survival Seed Vault is the original emergency seed bank from MyPatriotSupply.com. This survival seed kit was designed as a way to allow you to answer yes to all of these important questions! MyPatriotSupply is a premium emergency seed supplier located in the United States. We are a group of folks with a passion for self-reliance and freedom, and love sharing that with our customers. The Survival Seed Vault is the industry’s premiere emergency seed bank and contains only the highest quality survival garden seeds.

These emergency seeds are 100% Non-GMO, open-pollinated and placed in specially sealed packets allowing for long term storage. Our “competitors” sell knock-off survival emergency seed banks foras much as $140! They claim to give you 50,000 (or some other over-inflated number) survival garden seeds – but then you find out you have mostly junk seeds that were overstock from several years ago. Not with us! You pay one low price for our premium survival seed kit that includes a large balance of survival garden seeds from the most recent harvest.

The Survival Seed Vault survival seed kit is packaged for long term storage (5+ years) but priced for planting this year! Because of our affordable pricing, the majority of our customers buy for both survival garden planting and storage! Reviewer: Linda L King from Stuart, VA United States “The order was fantastic and they were so very helpful. In fact, I plan to order more – that’s how much I think of your business. You are the Best!!” Your Genesis Garden® emergency seed bank comes with the following features: Feature Benefit Airtight metal storage container Gives your seeds long-term protection E-Z Lock resealable, reusable triple-layered seed packets Store unused seed safely to reduce waste & provides ultimate protection for storage of seed you harvest! 20 Jumbo sized seed packets with easy-to-grow vegetables Great for both the beginner & experienced gardener! Open pollinated seeds can be grown, harvested & replanted endlessly

Never worry about your seed supply running out. Achieve food independence by having the ability to harvest seeds from your heirloom vegetable plants! Resealable storage container Want to take a peek inside? That’s okay, we provide an easy method to put the lid back on your seed bank! Pre-selected varieties are zone-friendly to most growing regions No need to worry about complicated varieties that won’t grow in your area! Planting instructions and seed harvesting guide included! Step-by-step instructions on planting and harvesting included – takes the guesswork away and gives you peace of mind! “I received my order very quickly! I was curious as to the quality of the seeds – so I opened the can and planted some in my green house. Germination rate was excellent!

I have not been this impressed with an heirloom seed company in quite some time. Thanks MPS!” Your Genesis Garden® seed order comes with: Variety Seed Count Blue Lake Bush Bean Over 150 emergency seeds California Wonder Bell Pepper Over 70 emergency seeds Scarlet Nantes Carrot Over 800 emergency seeds Marketmore Cucumber Over 150 emergency seeds Parris Island Cos Romaine Lettuce Over 900 emergency seeds Golden Acre Cabbage Over 530 emergency seeds Detroit Dark Red Beet Over 260 emergency seeds Lincoln Shell Sweet Pea Over 100 emergency seeds Lucullus Swiss Chard Over 160 emergency seeds Beefsteak Tomato Over 180 emergency seeds Champion Radish Over 320 emergency seeds Green Sprouting Broccoli Over 500 emergency seeds Waltham Butternut Winter Squash Over 100 emergency seeds Bloomsdale Long Standing Spinach Over 260 emergency seeds Yellow Sweet Spanish Onion Over 145 emergency seeds Golden Bantam Sweet Corn Over 250 emergency seeds Hales Best Cantaloupe Over 70 emergency seeds Snowball Cauliflower Over 285 emergency seeds Black Beauty Zucchini Over 50 emergency seeds Crimson Sweet Watermelon Over 60 emergency seed.

Heirloom Seeds — www.mypatriotsupply.com/?27606

March 26th, 2013

Heirloom_Vegetable_Seeds 

 

Heirloom Vegetabled Seeds

Do you love fresh vegatables?

http://www.mypatriotsupply.com/HeritageVegetable_Seeds_s/43.htm/?27606

https://www.amazon.com/gp/yourstore/home?ie=UTF8&ref_=topnav_ys

www.mypatriotsupply.com/?click+27606

The MyPatriotSupply survival store was founded in 2008 by people with a passion for self-sufficiency and emergency preparedness. We not only understand the drive to practice emergency preparedness, we are active participants in the survivalist lifestyle. We earnestly believe that true freedom comes from attaining a certain level of self-reliance and our survival store was created with this truth in mind.

MyPatriotSupply features only the finest quality survival items, including our signature Survival Seed Vault, a wide selection of individual survival heirloom seeds, an array of home canning supplies, and the finest long term storage food currently available. MyPatriotSupply also specializes in emergency water filtration, and features the Lifestraw, the award winning personal water filtration straw that eliminates 99.99999% of waterborne bacteria and parasites. So no matter what your survival needs, you can trust that you will find quality products and be treated with respect. We believe that fear mongering and price gouging are unacceptable, so we price each survival item fairly and offer free shipping on all orders over $49.

http://tinyurl.com/a7pc4xy

 

Heirloom Seeds

MyPatriotSupply proudly features only the finest heritage seeds harvested from hearty, delicious crops. All of our heirloom vegetable seeds are 100% Non-GMO!

MyPatriotSupply’s survival heirloom seeds are all packaged in special triple-layered, resealable, reusable mylar packets - designed to significantly increase the shelf-lifeand viability of our heritage seeds.

So not to worry if you don’t get around to planting them all this year! Our heritage seeds are designed for long-term storage, but priced for year-to-year gardening. That’s the My Patriot Supply difference!

 

MyPatriotSupply’s survival heirloom seeds are all packaged in special triple-layered, resealable, reusable mylar packets - designed to significantly increase the shelf-lifeand viability of our heritage seeds.

So not to worry if you don’t get around to planting them all this year! Our heritage seeds are designed for long-term storage, but priced for year-to-year gardening. That’s the My Patriot Supply difference!

The MyPatriotSupply survival store was founded in 2008 by people with a passion for self-sufficiency and emergency preparedness. We not only understand the drive to practice emergency preparedness, we are active participants in the survivalist lifestyle. We earnestly believe that true freedom comes from attaining a certain level of self-reliance and our survival store was created with this truth in mind.

MyPatriotSupply features only the finest quality survival items, including our signature Survival Seed Vault, a wide selection of individual survival heirloom seeds, an array of home canning supplies, and the finest long term storage food currently available. MyPatriotSupply also specializes in emergency water filtration, and features the Lifestraw, the award winning personal water filtration straw that eliminates 99.99999% of waterborne bacteria and parasites. So no matter what your survival needs, you can trust that you will find quality products and be treated with respect. We believe that fear mongering and price gouging are unacceptable, so we price each survival item fairly and offer free shipping on all orders over $49.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/yourstore/home?ie=UTF8&ref_=topnav_ys

 

 

 

SOME SECRETS OF GOOD COOKING

March 19th, 2013
26

http://www.mypatriotsupply.com/$Click=27606

http://www.mypatriotsupply.com/$Click=27606

 

 

The Addition of one or two teaspoons of baking powder to plain pastry will add wonderfully to its qualities, making it very light and tender.
Omelets are improved by the addition of a small amount of Baking Powder.
Baking Powder may be added with great advantage to bread pudding, poultry dressing, stuffed or deviled crabs and other preparations in which broken bead or bread crumbs are used.
Icings and especially Ornamental Icings are improved in texture and flavor by the addition of about a teaspoon of Baking Powder.
Instead of adding soda to keep color in green vegetables use Baking Powder.

BAKING POWDER
For raising or leavening breads, biscuits, rolls, muffins, griddle cakes, doughnuts, cakes, pastries, puddings and other similar foods.

Absolutely Pure and Wholesome
The principal active ingredient of Baking powder is cream of tartar, a derivative of rich, ripe grapes. It perfectly aerates and leavens the batter or dough and makes the food finer in appearance, more delicious to the taste, and more healthful.
It possesses the greatest practicable leavening strength, never varies in quality, and will keep fresh and perfect in all climates until used.
GENERAL SUGGESTIONS
Where shortening is mentioned in the recipes it is understood that butter or lard, or an equivalent quantity of butter substitute or vegetable oil may be used.

MEASUREMENTS
All measurements for all materials called for in the recipes in this book are level.
The standard measuring cup holds one-half pint and is dived into fourths and thirds.
To make level measurements fill cup or spoon and scrape off excess with back of knife.
One-half spoon is measured lengthwise of spoon.
Sift flour before measuring.

BAKING
Regulate the oven carefully before mixing the ingredients. Many a cake otherwise perfectly prepared is spoiled because the oven is too hot or not hot enough.
Biscuits and pastry require a hot oven: cakes, a moderate oven.
When a cake is thoroughly baked it shrinks from the sides of the pan. A light touch with the finger; which leaves no mark is another indication that the cake is baked.

TABLE OF EQUIVALENT WEIGHTS
AND MEASURES
1 salt spoon = ¼ teaspoon
3 teaspoons = 1 tablespoon
16 tablespoons = 1 cup
2 cups = 1 pint
2 pints = 1 quart
4 cups = 1 quart
2 cups granulated sugar = 1 pound
4 cups flour = 1 pound
2 cups butter = 1 pound
2 tablespoons butter = 1 ounce
2 tablespoons liquid = 1 ounce
4 tablespoons flour = 1 ounce
1 square unsweetened chocolate = 1 ounce

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100% WHOLE WHEAT BREAD

March 13th, 2013
26

Home Made Bread

100% WHOLE WHEAT BREAD
For Your Bread Machine

In your mixing bowl, combine and mix on speed 1 until well blended:

• 6 cups hot water
• 2 tbsp Vital Wheat Gluten
• 2/3 cup oil
• 2 tbsp Tofu Drink Mix
• 2/3 cup honey
• 2 tbsp Dough Enhancer
• 2 tbsp Instant Yeast
• 4-6 cups freshly ground flour

Switch to speed 2:
Add 2 tbsp salt
Add slowly 6-10 cups whole wheat flour. Sprinkle in the last of the flour ¼ cup at a time. When enough Flour has been added, the dough pulls away cleanly from the sides of the bowl.

Knead: on speed 2 for another 5 minutes
Shape: into loaf pans and let rise until the dough doubles in size.
Bake: at 350 deg. F. for 30-40 minutes until top is golden brown.

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How Old is Too Old?

March 6th, 2013

home canned foods - images

 

How Old is Too Old?

Karin Allen, Ph.D., Food Quality & Entrepreneurship Specialist

Food Quality & Entrepreneurship

Utah State University Cooperative Extension

extension.usu.edu

 

Flour

What does it do?

Flour is the principal ingredient in most baked goods.  When mixed with water, gluten is formed from two specific proteins (gliadin and glutenin; Kontogiorgos 2011).  The more it’s mixed the, more gluten is formed.  This is what fives dough and batter their texture and structure at room temperature.  During baking, moisture in the dough begins to change the starch from the flour, causing it to swell and soften.  This is important for the texture and structure of the finished product.

 

What happens as it ages?

Starch changes very little as flour sits.  However, when the proteins that normally form gluten are exposed to air, they can change significantly.  These changes limit the amount of gluten that can be formed.

 

Can it still be used?

Starch changes very little as

Yes – but it is best to use flour more than 1 year old in products that don’t need a lot of gluten formed, like cakes and crumbly cookies.  Use new flour for bread and chewy cookies.

 

How should it be stored?

Keep flour in a tightly sealed container, away from heat and moisture.  Whole wheat flour can be stored in the freezer in air-tight air-tight bags to prevent it from becoming rancid.

Eggs

What does it do?

The protein in eggs (especially the whites) gives structure to many baked goods, including sponge cake, meringue, and cream puffs.  Eggs also contribute moisture, and they are the only source of water in many cookies recipes.

What happens as they age?

Egg shells appear solid, but they are actually very porous.  As eggs sit in the refrigerator moisture is lost through the pores (Jones & Musgrove 2005).  This is why old eggs (about 6 weeks) will float in water.

Can they still be used?

Yes – as long as the egg has been refrigerated, it is safe to use.  To use old eggs in cookies, you may need to add some water (1 – 2 teaspoons per egg) or the dough will be too dry.  Do not use old eggs in cakes, cream puffs, or meringue.

How should they be stored?

Keep eggs refrigerated until you are ready to use them.  Eggs can be frozen, but they be separated first.  To freeze yolks, add ¼ teaspoon sugar for each yolk and mix well (remember to reduce the sugar in your recipe when you use them).  Freeze whites as they are.

Fats

What does it do?

Butter gives flavor to may baked goods, but shortening often gives a better texture.  Fats and oils “tenderize” baked products by limiting the amount of gluten that can form.

What happens as it ages?

Fats and oils turn rancid when they are exposed to air.  Oxygen reacts with fatty acids, creating off flavors and aromas (Waraho et al. 2011).  Oils, which contain more mono- and poly-unsaturated fats acids, become rancid more quickly than fats that are solid at room temperature.

Can it still be used?

Yes, but if it smells bad, chances are your baked product will taste bad.  Do not use old shortening or butter in icing.

 

How should it be stored?

Butter, shortening, and oils do not need to be refrigerated or frozen, but they will last much longer if they are.  The chemical reaction that leads to rancidity happens more slowly to lower temperatures.

 

Sugar

What does it do?

In addition to flavor, sugar helps incorporate air when creamed together with shortening or butter.  Honey and brown sugar (which contains molasses) makes moister baked products.

What happens as it ages?

Granulated sugar does not change, but sometimes will develop an odd aroma.  This will not affect the baked product.  Brown sugar may harden and honey may crystallize.

Can it still be used?

Yes.  If brown sugar or honey has hardened, it can be microwaved on low power for 15-20 seconds.  As it sits it will begin to crystallize or re-harden, so use it immediately.  The honey container can also be put in a pan of boiling water to remove crystals.

How should it be stored?

Keep sugar in an air-tight container away from moisture and bugs.  Sugar and honey do not need to be refrigerated or frozen.

 

Ingredient

Can it still be used?

How should it be stored?

  Chocolate If the chocolate has a white layer on the surface (“blooming”), it may not work well for dipping.  Chocolate chips can still be used in cookies. Chocolate should be stored in cool place.  Chips and baking bits can be frozen.
Nuts The oil in nuts can go rancid quickly.  If the nuts smell bad, chances are they’ll taste bad as well.  Discard any nuts that appear moldy. Nuts should be stored in an air-tight container away from heat and light.  Nuts can be frozen.
Baking Powder Baking powder contains baking soda and a powdered acid.  Baking powder loses its leavening power as it sits.  Baking soda does not go bad Baking powder should be stored in the original container away from heat and moisture.  Most baking powders are stable for 1 year.
Spices Ground spices such as ginger, cinnamon, and nutmeg lose flavor over time.  More of the spice can be used to get the desired flavor intensity.  
Extracts and Oils Extracts contain alcohol, which makes their flavor stable for a long time.  Flavors oils may become rancid, but this is unusual Extracts can be stored at room temperature.  Oils can be refrigerated to maintain flavor.

 

 

ChocolateIf the chocolate has a white layer on the surface (“blooming”), it may not work well for dipping.  Chocolate chips can still be used in cookies.

Chocolate should be stored in cool place.  Chips and baking bits can be frozen.NutsThe oil in nuts can go rancid quickly.  If the nuts smell bad, chances are they’ll taste bad as well.  Discard any nuts that appear moldy.

Nuts should be stored in an air-tight container away from heat and light.  Nuts can be frozen.Baking PowderBaking powder contains baking soda and a powdered acid.  Baking powder loses its leavening power as it sits.  Baking soda does not go badBaking powder should be stored in the original container away from heat and moisture.  Most baking powders are stable for 1 year.SpicesGround spices such as ginger, cinnamon, and nutmeg lose flavor over time.  More of the spice can be used to get the desired flavor intensity. Extracts and OilsExtracts contain alcohol, which makes their flavor stable for a long time.  Flavors oils may become rancid, but this is unusualExtracts can be stored at room temperature.  Oils can be refrigerated to maintain flavor.

 

References

 

Jones, D.R. & Musgrove, M.T. (2005). Effects of extended storage on egg quality factors.  Poultry Science, 84, 1774-1777.

 

Kontogiorgos, V. (2011).  Microstructure of hydrated gluten network.  Food Research International, 44, 2582 – 2586.

 

Waraho, T., McClements, D.J., Decker, E.A. (2011) Mechanisms of lipid oxidation in food dispersions.  Trends in Food Science * Technology, 22, 3-13.

 

Utah State University is committed to providing and environment free from harassment and other forms of illegal discrimination based on race, color

 

Utah State University is committed to providing and environment free from harassment and other forms of illegal discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age (40 and older), disability, and veteran’s status.  USU’s policy also prohibits discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation in employment and academic related practices and decisions.  Utah State University employees and students cannot, because of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, or veteran’s status, refuse to hire; discharge; promote; demote terminate; discriminate in compensation; religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, or veteran’s status, refuse to hire discharge; promote; demote; terminate; discriminate in compensation or discriminate in the classroom, residence halls, or in on/off campus, USU-sponsored events and activities.  This publication is issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension work, acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Noelle E. Cockett, V ice president for Extension and Agriculture, Utah State University.

 

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Temperature Tests for Candy Making

February 28th, 2013

My Patriot Supply CompanyTemperature Tests for Candy Making

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There are two different methods of determining when candy has been cooked to the proper consistency. One is by using a candy thermometer in order to record degrees; the other is by using the cold water test. The chart below will prove useful in helping to follow candy recipes:

Type of Candy Degrees Cold water

Fondant, Fudge 234 – 238 Soft Ball

Divinity, Caramels 245 – 248 Firm Ball

Taffy 265 – 270 Hard Ball

Butterscotch 275 – 280 Light Crack

Peanut Brittle 285 –290 Hard Crack

Caramelized Sugar 310 –321 Caramelized

In using the cold water test, use a fresh cupful of cold water for each test. When testing, remove the candy from the fire and pour about ½ teaspoon of candy into the cold water. Pick the candy up in the fingers and roll into a ball if possible.

In the SOFT BALL TEST the candy will roll into a soft ball; which quickly loses its shape when removing from the water.

In the FIRM BALL TEST the candy will roll into a firm but not hard ball. It will flatten out a few minutes after being removed from water.

In the HARD BALL TEST the candy will roll into a hard ball which has lost almost all plasticity and will roll around on a plate on removal from the water.

In the LIGHT CRACK TEST the candy will form brittle threads; which will soften on removal from the water.

In the HARD CRACK TEST the candy will form brittle threads in the water, which will remain brittle after being removal from the water.

In CARMELIZING, the sugar first melts then becomes a golden brown. It will form a hard brittle ball in cold Water.

APPLETS

2 cups grated apples 2/3 cup water

4 cups sugar 1 tsp. almond flavor

4 envelopes Knox gelatin 1 cup walnuts

Stir apples and sugar good and boil hard for 5 minutes, and then simmer for 30 minutes. Add flavoring and nuts. Let set overnight; cut into squares and roll in powdered sugar.

Use 9×9 inch pan.

PEANUT BUTTER CUPS

½ lb. graham cracker crumbs 1 ½ cups peanut butter (chunky style)

1 lb. powdered sugar Chocolate chips or 8 oz.

2 sticks melted butter Chocolate chips or 1 tsp. or 8 oz. chocolate bar

Mix together and press into a 9×13 inch pan. Melt chocolate chips or one (8 ounce chocolate bar and spread over peanut butter mixture. Cool. Cut into bars.

PEANUT BUTTER RICE KRIPIES

½ cup sugar

1 cup white Karo syrup

1 cup peanut butter

6 cups Rice Krispies

16 oz. chocolate chips

16 oz. butterscotch chips

Mix together and press into a 9×13 inch pan. Melt chocolate chips or one (8 oz.) chocolate bar and spread over peanut butter mixture. Cool. Cut into bars.

PEANUT BRITTLE

1 cup sugar 1 cup raw peanuts

½ cup Karo white syrup 1 tsp butter

¼ cup water 1 tsp soda

Boil three ingredients in a skillet, stirring constantly, until you can form a hard ball in cold water. Add 1 cup raw peanuts. Stir the contents to cook the nuts until the contents have sort of a creamy look, and then add 1 teaspoon butter. Let cook a minute or so and add 1 teaspoon of soda. These last ingredients being measured out before cooking. Let it brown to a peanut brittle color. Pour onto a buttered cookie sheet. Put in a cold room to cool; crack it to desired size and eat.

POPCORN BALLS

Mix together:

2 cup sugar 2 cubes real butter

1 cup white Karo syrup

Cook until syrup forms soft ball in cold water (not long).

Add ½ teaspoon soda dissolved in ½ teaspoon cold water.

When foaming stops, pour over popcorn. Stir and form into balls

Mother’s Chewy Carmel Popcorn Balls

February 26th, 2013

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Mix together:

2 cups Brown Sugar

1 cup Brown Karo Syrup

2 cups real butter (margarine will not taste the same)

Pour over very large bowl or popped corn.

            Cook until syrup forms soft ball in cold water (not long).  Add ½ teaspoon soda dissolved in ½ teaspoon cold water.  When foaming stops, pour Carmel over popcorn.  Stir until Carmel form into balls or drop Carmel corn loosely over a sheet of wax paper; and continue stirring and separating corn with your hands that you have dipped in cold water.  Keep bowl of cold water close, so that you may continue to cool your hands off in cold water.  You may also fluff and separate with two tablespoons that you can dip the spoons into colds water.  Also, be careful not to add water directly into the Popcorn. 

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